Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Does this bother you?

At age 34, two years before his first election and two decades before he would run for governor of Virginia, Robert F. McDonnell submitted a master's thesis to the evangelical school he was attending in Virginia Beach in which he described working women and feminists as "detrimental" to the family. He said government policy should favor married couples over "cohabitators, homosexuals or fornicators." He described as "illogical" a 1972 Supreme Court decision legalizing the use of contraception by unmarried couples.

The 93-page document, which is publicly available at the Regent University library, culminates with a 15-point action plan that McDonnell said the Republican Party should follow to protect American families -- a vision that he started to put into action soon after he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates.

Answer Question
 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 11:54 AM on Aug. 31, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
Answers (62)
  • During his 14 years in the General Assembly, McDonnell pursued at least 10 of the policy goals he laid out in that research paper, including abortion restrictions, covenant marriage, school vouchers and tax policies to favor his view of the traditional family. In 2001, he voted against a resolution in support of ending wage discrimination between men and women.

    In his run for governor, McDonnell, 55, makes little mention of his conservative beliefs and has said throughout his campaign that he should be judged by what he has done in office, including efforts to lower taxes, stiffen criminal penalties and reform mental health laws. He reiterated that position Saturday in a statement responding to questions about his thesis.

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 11:54 AM on Aug. 31, 2009

  • I got bored about 2 lines into it.
    AllAboutKeeley

    Answer by AllAboutKeeley at 11:55 AM on Aug. 31, 2009

  • http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/08/29/AR2009082902434_pf.html

    He says his view have changed?
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 11:56 AM on Aug. 31, 2009

  • seriously, too long. you can't formulate a summary, then post a link?
    thundernlight

    Answer by thundernlight at 12:03 PM on Aug. 31, 2009

  • Who cares?
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 12:03 PM on Aug. 31, 2009

  • so, yes. Your question bothers me.
    thundernlight

    Answer by thundernlight at 12:03 PM on Aug. 31, 2009

  • If it don't look good - then don't stick it out on your front porch! What's been published has in essence being concreted for all time - that's hard to get away from. What I would want to know is what are his beliefs now, and what proof can he offer that he no longer supports his original views. If his proof was satisfactory - then I'd drop it. If not, I'd keep investigating, digging and questioning. Plus, if you aspire to a leadership role (church, school, social or government) then you should expect to be held to a higher standard than the normal person. Don't just tell me you've changed - show me.
    PaceMyself

    Answer by PaceMyself at 12:07 PM on Aug. 31, 2009

  • thunderlight, I DID post the link

    Pacemyself- he says his beliefs have changed NOW. Although During his 14 years in the General Assembly, McDonnell pursued at least 10 of the policy goals he laid out in that research paper, including abortion restrictions, covenant marriage, school vouchers and tax policies to favor his view of the traditional family. In 2001, he voted against a resolution in support of ending wage discrimination between men and women.
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 12:15 PM on Aug. 31, 2009

  • i know sweet - point is, SUMMARIZE and post link. you just copied info from link. Maybe try to summarize and ask a question pertaining to that, then post a link so people can follow the story for themselves.
    thundernlight

    Answer by thundernlight at 12:20 PM on Aug. 31, 2009

  • Lol, I don't live in Va. If I did, I wouldn't have voted for him. He'll never run for potus with that resume, so nope, doesn't bother me.

    Now, Specter buthers me. We can talk about his shady azz If you want.
    lovinangels

    Answer by lovinangels at 12:20 PM on Aug. 31, 2009

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.
close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN