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Various ?'s re: Bible

(1st I'm not particularly religious to begin with)

Bible Revision:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32644719/ns/us_news-faith/?GT1=43001

I don't understand this concept. I don't understand why anyone who followed the Bible would think this is a good idea...my way of thinking is if you REALLY wanted to know what the Bible actually said; you'd learn the language it was originally written in. I don't understand how it's still the "word of God" if man has changed it and massaged it into modern meanings...

Isn't the fact that this happens fairly regularly proof that the Bible is and always has been written by men and is not divine in itself? That while it might be a good framework to learn from it should not be taken literally?

And btw how many versions of the Bible are there anyway (more proof of man's interference)...and what do you think about the sections left out way back in Nicaea?

Answer Question
 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 10:42 PM on Sep. 1, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Answers (36)
  • "my way of thinking is if you REALLY wanted to know what the Bible actually said; you'd learn the language it was originally written in."

    So you know Hebrew?
    HomeschoolingJa

    Answer by HomeschoolingJa at 10:44 PM on Sep. 1, 2009

  • OP Here: to HomeschoolingJa


    No "Ms. Snotty-pants" I don't personally; but I'm not trying to follow the Bible literally either! And how hard would it be to learn? There are oh IDK about 15 million speakers world wide...what point are you trying to make?

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:48 PM on Sep. 1, 2009

  • IMO, the Bible is God's Holy Word, either you believe or you don't...your choice.
    army_wife2000

    Answer by army_wife2000 at 10:55 PM on Sep. 1, 2009

  • "No "Ms. Snotty-pants" I don't personally; but I'm not trying to follow the Bible literally either! And how hard would it be to learn? There are oh IDK about 15 million speakers world wide...what point are you trying to make?"

    You're the one who wrote it. Don't imply tone in my written word.
    HomeschoolingJa

    Answer by HomeschoolingJa at 10:59 PM on Sep. 1, 2009

  • HomeschoolingJa
    Ok because you weren't trying to be a smart aleck with your response. Whatever you say...

    army_wife2000
    Uh thanks; I guess???


    Only two replies so far and neither bothered to actually respond to the questions...so much for a discussion this evening...

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:26 PM on Sep. 1, 2009

  • my father is currently learning Hebrew & knows some Greek. he said its AMAZING the things that are lost in translation. i have 4 years of university level courses on the Bible (from a Christian college mind you) & i agree that there is too much possibility for error in the translation of the Bible. but that doesnt mean that everything in it is pointless or un-divine, just that it shouldnt be taken so literally. i feel one should really look into the context of the books, when they were written, why, & to who.

    off the top of my head there are at least 14 versions: NIV, King James, New KJ, English Standard, Classic ES, American Standard, New AS, The Message, Amplified Bible, New Living, Darby, Holman, Young's, & Worldwide...there are more im sure. but most Christians (that i know) use either the NKJ, NIV, or NAS...they are pretty similar from my experiences.
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 11:38 PM on Sep. 1, 2009

  • there is too much possibility for error in the translation of the Bible. but that doesnt mean that everything in it is pointless or un-divine, just that it shouldnt be taken so literally. i feel one should really look into the context of the books, when they were written, why, & to who.


    That was what I was trying to get at; THANK YOU for joining the discussion! lol


    I guess I kind of feel like if we expect students to learn Old English to properly appreciate and enjoy Shakespeare; why would some feel it's acceptable to "update" or "modernize" the Bible?!?  Shouldn't those being taught to follow it be taught to do so in the most un-adulterated form?

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 12:05 AM on Sep. 2, 2009

  • There's no reason to learn Hebrew or Greek because there are things such as a Concordance that will tell you what each word in the Bible means in its respective language. Although a basic understanding of Greek is helpful in life anyway. And there is much controversy over translations. I personally only use the King James Version because it's the only English version that was translated straight from the original manuscripts, which we no longer have. Any other version is either translated from the KJV or from other manuscripts that are not original. So they aren't trustworthy, in my opinion. God promised to always make His Word available and that it would never be destroyed, so I believe there will always be a true version available.
    Laura2U

    Answer by Laura2U at 12:28 AM on Sep. 2, 2009

  • This article is only talking about the NIV which hasn't been revised in 25 years. There are other more recent translations and versions since the last NIV one from other translations/publishers of the Bible.

    From what I read in the article, they're not trying to make changes forcing their own understanding overtop of what the original language says; they're just using gender inclusive language (like saying "humankind" instead of "mankind") when the text does not call for a specific gender to be referred to. They're trying to put their translation of the Bible into more modern terms to best relay what the original language is trying to say in a way modern people will understand.

    Will I agree with their translation? Can't say until I read it. Yes, I think it is best to read the Bible parallel to the original language with a good corresponding dictionary at hand! (cont)
    NovemberLove

    Answer by NovemberLove at 12:50 AM on Sep. 2, 2009

  • But not everyone is good at learning or reading between two languages. Some people have very basic reading skills and have to rely on the translation that's presented along with how the Holy Spirit leads them. I do not think that the meaning of the original language should be changed to suit modern purposes but if word choices need to be made differently to BETTER portray the INTENDED meaning into more modern language so that people can have a better understanding of the Bible? I don't have a problem with that. I'll have to see how I feel when this translation comes out :-)
    NovemberLove

    Answer by NovemberLove at 12:54 AM on Sep. 2, 2009

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