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Why the problem giving thanks to God?

So- true story here:
Talking to a person about a difficult situation and needing a way to take control. Finally the idea comes like a flashing sign and automatic pilot (or God and I believe) takes over. The problem is fixed. An atheist hears this and decides it is time to speak up. For no reason calls out that I have a problem because I refuse to believe in myself.

One, what is the best way to handle the unasked for opinon? Two, why would someone who doesn't even believe in God and hardly knows me give two birds or a turtle who I give credit for something that in no way involved them?

Anytime I hear that song "Jesus take the wheel" I remember how much Jesus is in the driver seat. Some day He is going to ask me to take the wheel, not sure I could do that if Jesus doesn't stay in the passenger seat.

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 8:17 PM on Sep. 12, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

This question is closed.
Answers (31)
  • I give thanks to Him daily. 1. Been healed and free of cancer 7+ years now, 2. Have two children, and was told would never get pregnant. 3. Was in a roll over car accident with both kids, and without a doubt had His angels protecting all three of us, For those who choose not believe, that is up to you. God is real, and does deserve our thanks.
    3rdDay

    Answer by 3rdDay at 8:22 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

  • I'd say it's just a sign of the times really. Anything goes, question everything, and faith in nothing. Thankfulness will soon be a bygone word.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 8:21 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

  • Praise the Lord! What a powerful testimony, 3rdDay!

    OP, there will always be opposers of God's truth. You know your own experiences, don't worry about the people who'll put them down. Pray for the nay-sayers and continue thanking and praising our God.
    Lexylex

    Answer by Lexylex at 8:38 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

  • If the atheist was not at all part of the conversation, it was not his or her place to offer that two cents in that manner (this is coming from an atheist.) Now if you were going on and on to the atheist and asking "don't you think that's what happened?" or pressing the atheist to agree when the atheist is clearly trying to avoid the conversation, it would be different.

    But if you are seriously asking why the atheist has a problem giving personal thanks to god, um, it's because we think there is no god to thank. And it's not that we have a problem with it -- that's like having a problem with Santa because a certain toy was not under the tree.
    roachiesmom

    Answer by roachiesmom at 8:51 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

  • That person was clearly just looking to agitate. I don't believe in the power of prayer and I certainly don't credit God for every good thing in my life/the world. If I did that, I would also have to "blame" him for all of the bad, and I'd have to seriously wonder why some prayers get answered and others don't. That said, I don't see the harm in keeping your mouth shut when someone who does believes that God has guided them says so. However, I would expect the same consideration in return---i.e. no proselytizing.
    shesajar

    Answer by shesajar at 8:53 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

  • An atheist hears this

    You're missing a very important detail here. How exactly did the atheist hear it in the first place?
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 8:56 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

  • You're missing a very important detail here. How exactly did the atheist hear it in the first place?
    ___
    Actually I am not sure that is an important detail. If I was not including her in the conversation, was not talking to her and did not look at her what difference does it make? but to answer you question, I talking to a friend when this stranger wanted to but her nose in out conversation. So I guess the atheist was on top of butting into my business was also listening in on my business. If I should or should not be talking about my faith in public is another issue. But this is America and I can praise God to my friend if I want or don't want.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:05 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

  • sorry about those missing words- I got a phone call

    corrections :but to answer you(r) question
    I(was) talking to a friend when this stranger wanted to but her nose in ou(r) conversation
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:09 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

  • **Actually I am not sure that is an important detail.**
    It is....if you were having a conversation w/this person, depending on your tone and what you were saying, s/he may have felt that you were proselytizing. And to those who don't share your faith, that's a *really* annoying thing to have forced upon you.
    shesajar

    Answer by shesajar at 9:11 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

  • But see, that was important. If she walked up and butted into your conversation, it was wrong. If, however, you'd walked up to her and announced what happened, it would've been a perfectly valid response. Similarly if it was something you were running around posting in journals or questions or on a bumper sticker - all places that are inviting opinions whether you want them or not.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 9:13 PM on Sep. 12, 2009

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