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Business parting with republican party over health care reform?

WASHINGTON -- Business is parting from its traditional allies in the Republican Party on health care as companies and big corporate lobbyists lend tentative support to a congressional overhaul that conservative lawmakers staunchly oppose.

The rift mirrors a similar divide on other issues, including immigration and climate change, where many companies have backed legislative action that Republican lawmakers oppose.

But the health-care debate, in particular, casts a spotlight on the split in the longstanding alliance between economic conservatives and the business community. Republican lawmakers are digging in to oppose the overhaul effort as a big-spending government intrusion. Many companies, on the other hand, cite soaring costs to explain why they continue to back the congressional work under way to revamp the health-care system, despite misgivings over a range of provisions.

 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 9:51 AM on Sep. 25, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

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Answers (19)
  • Face it people, what we are seeing is a country that wants reform. What most people are seeing is Conservatives being almost fanatical about opposing almost everything that involves change.
    lori232

    Answer by lori232 at 10:32 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • "We are now at a crisis point," said Joe Olivo, who has struggled to keep up with rising health costs as the president of Perfect Printing Inc., a 40-employee printing company in Moorestown, N.J.

    Mr. Olivo is apprehensive about many proposed Democratic fixes, above all the push to create a government-run insurance program. But he said he was also "disappointed that the Republicans don't seem to be at the table at all."

    The business world this summer largely recoiled from legislation put forward in the House, which would mandate that employers provide employee coverage and would create a public insurance option.

    But companies have been far more receptive to the plan released last week by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus. The Baucus bill, which the committee is now busy amending, wouldn't include an employer mandate.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125383674980139461.html
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 9:51 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • "disappointed that the Republicans don't seem to be at the table at all."


    Orin Hatch isn't trying? Sen. Orrin Hatch (R., Utah) offered an amendment that would have required the Health and Human Services secretary to certify that no more than one million Americans would lose their current health plan under the bill. He argued proposed cuts to private insurers that administer Medicare plans effectively break the Democratic pledge that Americans will be able to keep their existing coverage. "What I don't want to do is take coverage away from people who love their coverage," he said.

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 10:05 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • and so, what do you think sweet?
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:05 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • Sen. Orrin Hatch: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Let me begin this morning by first commending you and your staff for your sincere commitment toward finding a bipartisan solution to reforming our health care system. I can sincerely state that each of us, on both sides of the aisle, had hopes that we could be here today considering a health care reform bill that enjoyed wide bipartisan support.Unfortunately, due to outside pressures and arbitrary timelines faced by the Chairman, we are now considering a bill that once again proposes ¿ more spending, more government and more taxes as a solution to reforming one-sixth of our economy.

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 10:08 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • Let me take a moment to highlight some of the policies proposals found in the legislation that we are considering today:


    o $27 billion in new taxes on employers that will disproportionately affect the hiring practices of low-income Americans at a time when our unemployment rate is almost in double digits.


    o $20 billion in new taxes on a new mandate on families making as little as $66,000 being penalized up to $3,800 for not buying a Washington-defined plan. This is a new tax on middle class families.


    o $300 billion in NEW excise taxes on everyone from insurance providers to device makers to clinical labs -- and every expert will tell you that these - so called fees - will all be simply passed on to American families on everything from their already sky-high insurance premiums to blood tests to thermometers to hearing aids. So much for reducing costs.

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 10:09 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • I sent a letter to the President, right before his joint address to Congress, asking him to do exactly what Americans families are demanding -- step back, take a deep breath and start over on a truly bipartisan bill. There is still time to press reset and push for a solution that can bring us all together.


     


    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.


     


     

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 10:09 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • I think it's interesting that business would part with that party on anything and the fact that they ARE says a lot.
    I don't think everything proposed should go through, but its blatantly obvious that the republican party as a whole (minus a FEW) don't want to even try. They just want to oppose for the sake of opposition. You can't have 80% in common and don't pass a bill with ZERO republican votes. Thats politics, not government
    This is the best summary, for me:

    "We are now at a crisis point," said Joe Olivo, who has struggled to keep up with rising health costs as the president of Perfect Printing Inc., a 40-employee printing company in Moorestown, N.J.

    Mr. Olivo is apprehensive about many proposed Democratic fixes, above all the push to create a government-run insurance program. But he said he was also "disappointed that the Republicans don't seem to be at the table at all."
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 10:12 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • I sent a letter to the President, right before his joint address to Congress, asking him to do exactly what Americans families are demanding -- step back, take a deep breath and start over on a truly bipartisan bill. There is still time to press reset and push for a solution that can bring us all together.


    They can't come together when MOST of teh republicans don't want to.

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 10:12 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/09/22/AR2009092201664.html


    While I do think the 'right' could be doing more in some areas.... I also think they are continuously SHUT DOWN by Democratic Leadership. Face it Sweet~Democrats do NOT want a bi-partisan plan. They want their liberal agenda to pass despite many attempts for bi-partisanship reform. Democrats have made deals with Big Pharma and Hospitals to gain profit from reform. This is a special interest filled agenda.

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 10:14 AM on Sep. 25, 2009

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