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From the mouth of the marine that built Gitmo, understand what he is saying?

CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – The Marine commander who built the Guantanamo Bay prison said Thursday the U.S. lost the "moral high ground" with its brutal treatment of prisoners, and the facility should be closed as quickly as possible.

It was the first time Maj. Gen. Michael Lehnert publicly acknowledged his doubts, although he said he did make his concerns known through the appropriate chain of command.

Lehnert, 58, was commander of Joint Task Force 160 when it was assigned to build prison cells in 2001 at the U.S. Navy base in Cuba to hold designated "enemy combatants" from Afghanistan and elsewhere.

He said he was given little guidance from the Pentagon, but he did have his staff read the Geneva Convention, the international agreement governing treatment of prisoners.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090925/ap_on_re_us/us_marine_guantanamo

 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 4:41 PM on Sep. 25, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
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Answers (48)
  • I miss the days when the United States was considered the "city on a hill", an example of morality and decency to the world.

    We now have people who are so sick and twisted, that they can sanctimoniously justify unethical and immoral treatment of our prisoners simply because "they do it too".

    Who cares if the ends justify the means? The minute we abandoned the principles that once made us the greatest country on earth, we lowered ourselves to the level of the terrorists.

    I'd rather die 100 times by a terrorist's bomb or blade, than see the country I love and served dragged down into the mud.
    lori9878

    Answer by lori9878 at 6:24 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • "I wanted to run it close to Geneva Convention rules," Lehnert said. "Our job was to take them out of the fight, and once we had done that, I felt we had a moral responsibility to take care of them."

    However, another task force was put in charge of interrogating detainees, and there were disagreements over their treatment, Lehnert said.

    "I think it is extraordinarily important how we treat prisoners," he said. "Obviously, there were other views."

    "I came to the conclusion very soon that this probably wasn't the right way to go," said Lehnert, who served just 100 days at the base.

    "Probably before I left Guantanamo, I was of the opinion it needed to go away as soon as possible," he said.
    The general said he didn't feel the U.S. would get much useful information by using the techniques.

    "I think we lost the moral high ground," he said.
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 4:41 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • clapping

    viridian

    Answer by viridian at 4:46 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • I'm just curious which is more important.....moral high ground or the lives of thousands of innocent people.....hmmmmmm......that aside.... I would really like to know SPECIFICALLY what techniques you think they should use?




    • Offering realistic incentives: such as immediate (coffee, cigarettes, and so forth), short?term (a meal, shower, send a letter home, and so forth), and long?term (repatriation, political asylum, and so forth).

    • Feigning experience similar to those of the source.

    • Showing concern for the prisoner through the use of voice vitality and body language.

    • Helping the source to rationalize his guilt.

    • Showing kindness and understanding toward the source's predicament.

    • Exonerating the source from guilt.

    • Flattering the source.


    momof030404

    Answer by momof030404 at 4:50 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • Those are from the Army field manual.......yeah I am SURE the PSYCHOPATH terrorists will fold under THAT!


    http://www.globalsecurity.org/intell/library/policy/army/fm/fm34-52/chapter3.htm

    momof030404

    Answer by momof030404 at 4:51 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • Morals are important. Happy to see someone with such high ranking in our military speaking out against the unjust treatment being given at Gitmo.
    Ginger0104

    Answer by Ginger0104 at 5:00 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • I'm just curious which is more important.....moral high ground or the lives of thousands of innocent people.....hmmmmmm......that aside.... I would really like to know SPECIFICALLY what techniques you think they should use?

    The ones that WORKED, which were NOT torture. The Army field manuel provides proven methods that are not torture to get people to talk. as for your INNOCENT LIVES comment, many that were tortured and or imprisoned for YEARS, were INNOCENT. Turned in by neighbor for thousands of $$ with no questions asked. Torture doesn't work, it serves as a recruiting tool for MORE terrorists which lead to more INNOCENT LIVES LOST!
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 5:00 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • Those are from the Army field manual.......yeah I am SURE the PSYCHOPATH terrorists will fold under THAT! http://www.globalsecurity.org/intell/library/policy/army/fm/fm34-52/chapter3.htm


    Actually, they do. They cooperate. They don't when torture is introduced, in fact they SHUT DOWN OR lie and say what they think you want to hear

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 5:01 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • Writing under the pseudonym of Matthew Alexander, a former special intelligence operations officer, who in 1996 led an interrogations team in Iraq, has written a compelling book where he details his direct experience with torture practices. He conducted more than 300 interrogations and supervised more than a thousand and was awarded a Bronze Star for his achievements in Iraq. Alexander's nonviolent interrogation methods led Special Forces to Abu Musab Al-Zarqawi, the head of Al-Qaeda in Iraq. His new book is titled "How to Break a Terrorist: The US Interrogators Who Used Brains, Not Brutality, to Take Down the Deadliest Man in Iraq."

    "It's extremely ineffective, and it's counterproductive to what we're trying to accomplish," he told reporters. "When we torture somebody, it hardens their resolve," Alexander explained. "The information that you get is unreliable ...
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 5:03 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

  • "The information that you get is unreliable ... And even if you do get reliable information, you're able to stop a terrorist attack, Al-Qaeda's then going to use the fact that we torture people to recruit new members." Alexander says torture techniques used in Iraq consistently failed to produce actionable intelligence and that methods outlined in the US Army Field Manual, which rest on confidence building, consistently worked and gave the interrogators access to critical information.

    Publication of the book was delayed for six weeks to allow the Pentagon to scrutinize it. Alexander said he wrote it under a pseudonym for security reasons. He says the US military's use of torture is responsible for the deaths of thousands of US soldiers because it inspired foreign fighters to kill Americans.
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 5:03 PM on Sep. 25, 2009

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