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Will you please read this article!!??

http://knol.google.com/k/marya-d-zilberberg/swine-origin-influenza-a-h1n1-virus-and/3htiswudddv6h/1?collectionId=28qm4w0q65e4w.1&position=11#

Answer Question
 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 11:20 PM on Oct. 24, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Answers (12)
  • Read it. So? It doesn't change anything.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:23 PM on Oct. 24, 2009

  • People not in the field just don't understand.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:24 PM on Oct. 24, 2009

  • Intensive-care specialists who fought to save desperately sick H1N1 flu patients this spring and summer have a warning for hospitals that haven't yet dealt with an influx of these difficult-to-treat patients.Experts predict ICUs are likely to be the main battlefield in the war against the pandemic virus, which so far doesn't appear to have much of a middle ground.
    The vast majority of people suffer through a typical bout of flu. But of those who become sick enough to be hospitalized, a significant portion -- maybe as high as 15 per cent, the World Health Organization says -- end up in ICUs for weeks, hovering between life and death.


    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:26 PM on Oct. 24, 2009

  • As an ICU doctor, it's very, very, very rare I can't deliver enough oxygen to someone to keep him alive. They die of other things, right? They die because their organs fail. In this case, we can barely oxygenate them."

    The worst-hit hospitals talk of having been on the brink of not being able to cope. They describe nearly running out of specialized equipment and the skilled staff needed to monitor these highly unstable patients in their high-tech hospital beds.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:27 PM on Oct. 24, 2009

  • Public health officials need to look for ways to keep novel H1N1 patients from getting this sick and help hospitals access enough key drugs, equipment and even staff to cope with an expected surge of cases in the fall and winter, says Dr. Anand Kumar, an intensive-care physician.
    Kumar was so concerned about what he saw in the city's ICUs earlier this year that he has been agitating, in medical and political circles, for stepped-up pandemic preparations for the country's hospitals.

    "I want the public-health people to understand: If we breach ICU capacity, a lot of people are going to die," he cautions.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:29 PM on Oct. 24, 2009

  • "What I've been telling everybody is: 'You've got to think about the ICU, because the ICU, for these kinds of events, is your choke point."'


    We don't have enough ICU beds or staff.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:30 PM on Oct. 24, 2009

  • We don't have enough ICU beds or staff.


    And the knowledge of this helps no one.  Hospital were warned months ago, if they failed to follow through, there is not much to be done now. 

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:33 PM on Oct. 24, 2009

  • You can't train ICU staff in a matter of months!
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:48 PM on Oct. 24, 2009

  • Educate the public. Get your vaccine!
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 11:49 PM on Oct. 24, 2009

  • Educate the public. Get your vaccine!


    I'm gonna pass. Maybe some other guinea pig would like it.

    Read the article. It really didn't make a whole lot of sense. As I understand it they did a lot of estimating. Wow.
    29again

    Answer by 29again at 4:26 AM on Oct. 25, 2009

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