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have to go back due to issues with sonogram..help!

My doc called today. I need to go see a specialist and get another ultrasound. Apparently, baby's brain measurements were "extremely high" as was the measurements for the neck flap (whatever that is)... They also said that baby's skull appeared to fuse in places it shouldn't be fusing. The doc told me the name of whatever it is they think is wrong with my baby, but I can't remember because I just froze when he told me. I'm trying to find information on it, but I'm freaking out and can't find anything. I know it had "ceph" in it, and I believe it started with a D. Any resources would be helpful.

 
laird6372

Asked by laird6372 at 1:07 AM on Oct. 29, 2009 in Pregnancy

Level 18 (5,888 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (12)
  • Dolichocephaly (also know as, scaphocephaly) refers to the condition where the head is disproportionately long and narrow (see cranial index. Dolichocephaly can result from the premature fusion of the sagittal suture (see craniosynostosis) or from external deformation. Dolichocephaly is particularly common among infants who are born prematurely.

    Diagnosis: The diagnosis begins with an examination by a pediatrician, pediatric neurosurgeon or craniofacial surgeon. A primary objective of the examination is to rule out craniosynostosis (a condition that requires surgical correction). The initial examination involves questions about gestation, birth, in utero and post-natal positioning (for example, sleeping position). The physical examination includes inspection of the infant's head and may involve palpation (carefcarefully feeling) of the child's skull for suture ridges and soft spots (the fontanelles). The physician may also
    WAREIZLILYBUGZ

    Answer by WAREIZLILYBUGZ at 2:19 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • dolichocephaly?
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:14 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • Oxycephaly. Involves premature closure of the coronal suture that connects the front, top and sides of the skull.


    Plagiocephaly. Premature unilateral fusion (joining of one side) of the coronal or lambdoid sutures that connect the top and sides to the back of the skull.


    Scaphocephaly. Premature fusion of the sagittal suture that connects the sides of the skull.


    Trigonocephaly. Premature fusion of the metopic suture (part of the frontal suture that joins the two halves of the frontal bone of the skull).
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:20 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • first-trimester ultrasound scan to measure the thickness of a flap of skin at the back of the fetal neck. A difference of a fraction of a millimeter may indicate the presence of Down syndrome.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:24 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • diencephalon..it's a part of the brain..did it have something to do with that?
    WAREIZLILYBUGZ

    Answer by WAREIZLILYBUGZ at 2:13 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • Diencephalon info

    Function:


    Chewing

    Directs Sense Impulses Throughout the Body

    Equilibrium

    Eye Movement, Vision

    Facial Sensation

    Hearing

    Phonation

    Respiration

    Salivation, Swallowing

    Smell, Taste
    Location:


    The diencephalon is located between the cerebral hemispheres and above the midbrain.
    Structures:


    Structures of the diencephalon include the thalamus, hypothalamus, the optic tracts, optic chiasma, infundibulum, Ventricle III, mammillary bodies, posterior pituitary gland and the pineal gland.
    WAREIZLILYBUGZ

    Answer by WAREIZLILYBUGZ at 2:14 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • (cont.) request x-rays or computerized tomography (a CAT scan, a series of photographic images of the skull). These images provide the most reliable method for diagnosing premature fusion of the sagittal suture (craniosynostosis). In addition, the physician may make (or order) a series of measurements from the child's face and head [more on cranial anthropometry]. These measurements will be used to assess severity and monitor treatment.

    Treatment: The treatment of dolichocephaly depends upon the etiology (cause) of the condition:

    Dolichocephaly esulting from fusion of the sagittal suture (craniosynostosis) must be treated surgically. Parents should consult a pediatric neurosurgeon or a craniofacial surgeon to discuss treatment option.

    Depending upon severity, dolichocephaly resulting from external/positional deformation can be treated with repositioning and/or head banding. Parents should consult a pediatrician, cont
    WAREIZLILYBUGZ

    Answer by WAREIZLILYBUGZ at 2:20 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • a pediatric neurosurgeon or a craniofacial surgeon for information on repositioning and/or for referral and a prescription for head banding.
    Support Groups:

    Plagiocephaly Parents Support
    Parents of Premature Babies Inc. (Preemie-L)
    Preemies.Org


    JUST IN CASE!!
    WAREIZLILYBUGZ

    Answer by WAREIZLILYBUGZ at 2:22 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • Thank you ladies!!! This one sounds right: Dolichocephaly .. It sounds like what the doc said, and the information you all provided most definitely sounds like what he talked about. Thank you so much for the replies. Now I can do some research!

    I really appreciate all the help! My mind just wasn't working when he told me, I was just in shock. Thank you so much!!
    laird6372

    Answer by laird6372 at 2:30 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • diencephalic syndrome
    WAREIZLILYBUGZ

    Answer by WAREIZLILYBUGZ at 2:32 AM on Oct. 29, 2009

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