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Christians, how did the timing and the day of Easter come about?

I notice that it changes each year. A few years ago is was very early.

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 4:32 PM on Oct. 29, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

Answers (23)
  • The Last Supper was the Passover seder; Easter is forever tied to Jewish roots.

    Now please explain to me chocolate eggs have to do with Easter.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:46 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • It's the first Sunday
    after the first Full Moon
    after the Spring Equinox.


    hummmmmmm...sounds kinda Pagan to me...
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:46 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • most christian holidays are undercover pagan celebrations
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:50 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • The timing has to do with the vernal equinox. Easter is the first Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal (spring) equinox. If you want more info on why that is google Easter timing and you'll get some pretty interesting links looking at how Easter is linked to Passover and how the current timing can be traced back to a debate between those who wanted to celebrate Easter on a Sunday (the day Jesus rose) and those who wanted to celebrate on the full moon no matter the day of the week - which in turn is because the Jews used a lunar rather than solar caledar.
    canadianmom1974

    Answer by canadianmom1974 at 4:56 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • i think that what eggs have to do with easter is a re-birth, the egg was hatched but the chicken emerges from the egg..like jesus was born but arose from the tomb to be born again
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 4:57 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • Eggs and bunnies,etc are a sign of fertility and birth,etc.
    Amaranth361

    Answer by Amaranth361 at 5:04 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • It's the first Sunday, after the first Full Moon, after the Spring Equinox.  hummmmmmm...sounds kinda Pagan to me...


    Nope Jewish.  Amazingly one does not have to be pagan to notice a full moon or know about the Spring Equinox.  There were several contraversies about calculating the date for Pascha (Easter).   Some Christians followed "Quartodeciman" which refers to celebrating Pascha/Easter on Nisan 14 of the Hebrew calendar - the Lord's passover others wanted to celebrate it on the following Sunday.  So there was some discussion about it for a few centuries.  But both groups talked with their Jewish neighbors to learn when the month of Nisan would fall and set the date accordingly. 

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 5:29 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • Later in the 3rd century there was some communities that didn't like relying on their neighbors to figure out when Easter was - and the big problem for some Christians was that the Jewish communities had Passover fall before the spring equinox in the Northern hemisphere. So at the Council of Nicea in 325 CE a formula for calculating the date of Pascha/Easter independent of the Jewish calculation for passover was done.

    So they knew they wanted Easter on a Sunday (since that's the day Christ rose form the dead). The date of Passover in the Hebrew calendar is based on the paschal full moon (the full moon that falls on or after the Spring Equinox) - so that would have been the date for the Last Supper. So NIcea figured Pascha/Easter to be the Sunday following the paschal full moon.
    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 5:38 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • Now - the paschal full moon falls on different days in different time zones - so the exact date of the paschal full moon isn't used during the calcuation - more of an approximation. (Otherwise Pascha/Easter would be on a different day depending on which time zone you lived in.)

    For calculation purposes, the full moon is always set at the 14th day of the lunar month (the lunar month begins with the new moon). So the date of the vernal equinox at March 21, even though it can occur on March 20. Both approximations allow a universal date for Pascha/Easter to be set.

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 5:41 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

  • But the confusion doesn't end there! See Christians in the West later adopted the Gregorian calendar (which is the one that is used through the west today). However, Christians in the East (generally the Eastern Orthodox) continue to use the older (and astronomically inaccurate) Julian Calendar. So Pascha/Easter in the West can fall on a date that is different than it's celebrated by Christians in the East.

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 5:44 PM on Oct. 29, 2009

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