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For moms who vaccinate and for moms who don't vaccinate. Has your pediatrician recommended a Antibody titer?

Antibody titer is a laboratory test that measures the presence and amount of antibodies in blood. The antibody level in the blood is a reflection of past exposure to an antigen or to something that the body does not recognize as belonging to itself. The body uses antibodies to attack and remove foreign substances.

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 2:10 PM on Nov. 1, 2009 in Babies (0-12 months)

This question is closed.
Answers (10)
  • Yes, mine has said we can use it down the road to see if the fourth vaccine (or third in some cases) is needed. I am delaying almot all vaccines, and tying to cut out as many as possible.
    apexmommy

    Answer by apexmommy at 7:12 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

  • cont...
    How the Test is Performed

    Blood is drawn from a vein, usually from the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand. The site is cleaned with germ-killing medicine (antiseptic). The health care provider wraps an elastic band around the upper arm to apply pressure to the area and make the vein swell with blood.

    Next, the health care provider gently inserts a needle into the vein. The blood collects into an airtight vial or tube attached to the needle. The elastic band is removed from your arm.

    Once the blood has been collected, the needle is removed, and the puncture site is covered to stop any bleeding.

    In infants or young children, a sharp tool called a lancet may be used to puncture the skin and make it bleed. The blood collects into a small glass tube called a pipette, or onto a slide or test strip. A bandage may be placed over the area if there is any bleeding.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:11 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

  • cont....
    Why the Test is Performed

    In some situations, your health care provider may check your antibody titer to see if you had an infection in the past (for example, chickenpox) or to decide which immunizations you need.

    The antibody titer is also used to determine:

    * The strength of an immune response to the body's own tissue in diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune disorders
    * Your need for a booster immunization
    * Whether a recent vaccine caused a strong enough response from your immune system to protect you against the specific disease
    * Whether you have, or recently had, an infection such as mononucleosis or viral hepatitis

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:13 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

  • that isn't how the test is performed it's how blood is drawn, what they do is draw blood then put it in a centrifuge to seperate the serum from the whole blood then test the serum for antibodies
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:13 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

  • cont...
    Normal Results

    Normal values depend on the antibody being tested. If your health care provider is testing for antibodies against your own tissue, then the normal value would be zero or negative. In some cases, a normal level is below a certain, specific number.

    If your health care provider is testing to see if an immunization brought your antibody titer up to a preventive level, then the normal result depends on the specific value for that immunization.

    Negative antibody tests can help rule out certain infections.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:14 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

  • cont...
    What Abnormal Results Mean

    If your health care provider is testing for antibodies against your own tissue, abnormal results would show a positive antibody titer. Depending on the strength of the titer, this could mean that your immune system is fighting its own tissue, cells, or substances.

    If your health care provider is testing to see if your immunization brought your antibody titer up to a preventive level, an abnormal result would indicate that your body has not mounted an adequate response against the immunization, and you are not adequately protected from the disease.

    A positive antibody test to infectious agents such as viruses can determine if you have a specific infection.

    Low levels may also occur if you have an immune deficiency.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:14 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

  • Boosters are not needed most of the time.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:21 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

  • For a baby? Um...it's very unlikely they have any antibodies for the diseases for which vaccines are available. Unless they've already had polio or whooping cough....
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:34 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

  • No my doctor has not recommended this.

    Do they suspect autoimmune disease, (assuming you vaccinate) do they want to see if your baby has already been adequately exposed to a particular childhood illness and so then forgo a certain vaccination, or do they want to forgo a booster (believing perhaps the baby is already immune after the first or second round of shots)?? If you don't vaccinate, maybe they want to see if your child has been exposed to an illness?

    I am confused as to what prompted your doctor to want to perform this test. I don't see a reason for doing one routinely.

    I know they sometimes perform it on adults to see if they need a booster shot due to loss of immunity, but I'm not entirely sure why they'd do this in a healthy child.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:48 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

  • What are you asking... I know what titers it, but what do you want to know???
    DaphneMae

    Answer by DaphneMae at 6:47 PM on Nov. 1, 2009

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