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Time to start worrying!

From Congresswoman Lois Capps (D) OWN website:

"This amendment prohibits cost-sharing requirements for Medicaid clinical preventive services (like screening for cancer and heart disease, as well as preventing serious infectious diseases, substance abuse, and vision and hearing disorders) that are rated A & B (highly recommended) by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

http://capps.house.gov/2009/11/capps-celebrates-house-passage-of-comprehensive-health-insurance-reform-bill.shtml

Why is this worrisome? Because...

The USPSTF recommends against routine screening mammography in women aged 40 to 49 years. The decision to start regular, biennial screening mammography before the age of 50 years should be an individual one and take patient context into account, including the patient's values regarding specific benefits and harms.
Grade: C recommendation.

http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstf/uspsbrca.htm

 
LoriKeet

Asked by LoriKeet at 12:42 PM on Nov. 22, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Level 45 (194,908 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (77)
  • But since this is the last statement in your question it doesn't seem to be all that big of an issue. I mean, putting the decision on the patient's values doesn't really sound like they are banning the procedure.

    I don't think you're getting what this amendment really says. Because they've downgraded it to a C procedure, Medicaid will be allowed to force any woman under 50 to pay a copay before they can have a mammogram. Now exactly how many women on Medicaid do you think can afford a copay? If this passes, Medicaid is about to get completely overrun as they force everyone below a certain income level to enroll - they will not offer subsidies to anyone below a certain income level, they will be required by law to enroll in medicaid or pay for their insurance entirely out of pocket.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 12:53 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

  • People claiming that mammogram news this week had nothing to do with health care reform are wrong, because this Democratic Congresswomans OWN website brags about her role in making them the group that decides whether you get care or not.

    This is NOT "fearmongering," this is REALITY!!!
    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 12:44 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

  • should be an individual one and take patient context into account, including the patient's values regarding specific benefits and harms.
    ___________________________
    I get that this so-called research based recommendation irks people. But since this is the last statement in your question it doesn't seem to be all that big of an issue. I mean, putting the decision on the patient's values doesn't really sound like they are banning the procedure.
    stacymomof2

    Answer by stacymomof2 at 12:48 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

  • stacy....did you see/read how screenings need to be rated an "A or B" in order to be recommended? Did you see how the USPSTF has graded mamograms a "C?"

    And you somehow think you'll have a choice as to whether or not you will be "granted" a mammogram under the Democratic plan?!

    This is just the beginning of rationed care and denials.
    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 12:51 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

  • eye rolling

    purpleducky

    Answer by purpleducky at 12:57 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

  • The USPSTF conducts rigorous, impartial assessments of the scientific evidence for the effectiveness of a broad range of clinical preventive services, including screening, counseling, and preventive medications. Its recommendations are considered the "gold standard" for clinical preventive services.


    The mission of the USPSTF is to evaluate the benefits of individual services based on age, gender, and risk factors for disease; make recommendations about which preventive services should be incorporated routinely into primary medical care and for which populations; and identify a research agenda for clinical preventive care.


    http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstfab.htm


    How can they be the "gold standard," if they don't even have an ONCOLOGIST on their "esteemed" panel?

    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 1:01 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

  • Really, ducky? All you can do is roll your eyes?! And we wonder why people like Obama, Pelosi and Reid achieve the power they do.
    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 1:02 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

  • When i heard this news about the mammo's, i immediately thought.. about the timing of it. i couldn't help but attach it to healthcare reform and wondered about it's consequences and whether it just happened to be a coincidence. I know all too well that everything that is face value... isn't always what it seems to be especially when we are talking politics. If health care reform weren't in question, would i be suspicious about this news.. HEC YEAH because i have known many women in their early twenty's, 30's and 40's to have had lumps many cancerous. When i heard that young women no longer need to self examine.. my eyebrows went up. I can't help but wonder what these guidelines will do for women across the country and how doctors will handle it. i heard a doctor today , she said she will continue to recommend yearly exams for mammos and self examinations. She said know your body and know your doctor's position. i agree.
    Aasiyah

    Answer by Aasiyah at 1:07 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

  • I also wondered about how the insurance companies would deal with these new guidelines and whether they woudl Stop footing the bills or add copays for those who continue to take yearly mammo's ... doesn't seem like a far fetched idea... now.. my eyebrows are still raised. i just turned 40 and was about to do my first mammo because i have no history of it in my family i didn't do it before then, however (i know that is no indication).. but it turns out i couldn't do it anyways because at the time of my appointment which i waited months for... i turned out to be shockingly pregnant. LOL. my advise to women is continue getting your examinations even if it cost you money. your life if worth it.
    Aasiyah

    Answer by Aasiyah at 1:10 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

  • This is just the beginning of rationed care and denials.
    ____________________________
    Well, I would be able to afford my mammogram out of pocket if other things were covered. My first mammogram was denied in 1992 by my insurance company after my Dr prescribed it due to me actually having cancer in my breast.
    stacymomof2

    Answer by stacymomof2 at 1:11 PM on Nov. 22, 2009

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