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CATHOLICS~~ Will you explain the difference of "real presence" and "transubstantiation"

Can you explain what is in the host? Such as you do believe it is skin, muscles tissues ect...

I always thought it was bread and Jesus (or the spirit of Jesus) was in ever part of the bread and real presence was more Lutheran beliefs that says Jesus is present during Eucharist but may not be in every part of the bread.



*Let Catholics or others who believe in the above words explain this please*

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 2:29 PM on Nov. 23, 2009 in Religion & Beliefs

This question is closed.
Answers (15)
  • "Then he took the bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them, saying, 'This is my body, which will be given for you; do this in memory of me.' And likewise the cup after they had eaten, saying, 'This is the new covenant in my blood, which will be shed for you." --Luke 22:19-20.

    "While they were eating, he took bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them, and said, 'Take it; this is my body.' Then he took a cup, gave thanks and gave it to them, and they all drank from it. He said to them, 'This is my blood of the covenant, which will be shed for many."--Mark 14:22-24.

    Every Gospel has an account with Jesus saying something about it being His body and blood. He didn't say it REPRESENTED it, He said it IS. That's how transubstation basically works...the substance is no longer bread and wine, it's Jesus's body and blood.
    MamaBee07

    Answer by MamaBee07 at 3:02 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • As far as I'm aware of they both mean that the bread and wine have been transformed into the blood and body of Christ.
    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 2:40 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • Okay...

    TRANSUBSTANTION: When the priest invokes the Holy Spirit (God) through the prayers asking God to change the SUBSTANCE of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ. The outward and taste do NOT change. But the substance--what it IS DOES change. (others can probably explain this better if my explanation sounds a bit hard to follow)

    This is where the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist comes in. Conscreated Host and Wine ARE the Body and Blood of Christ THROUGH the act of Transubstantion.

    Like I said...outwardly still look like bread and wine, but it's what it IS (the substance) is changed. So it's no longer bread and wine but actually the Body and Blood of Christ.

    Jesus did this at the time of the Last Supper when He said: "This IS My Body" and "This IS My Blood do this in memory of me." So Catholics do. Not just in memory of Christ, but because Christ SAID to do it.

    Cont....
    MamaBee07

    Answer by MamaBee07 at 2:47 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • Christ said in John 6:53-56: "Amen, amen, I asay to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you do not have life within you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him on the last day. For my flesh is true food, and my blood is true drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me and I in him."

    Matthew 26:26-28: "While they were eating, Jesus took bread, said the blessing, broke it, and giving it to his disciples said, 'Take and eat; this is my body.' Then he took a cup, gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, 'Drink from it, all of you, for this is my blood of the covenant, which will be shed on behalf of many for the forgiveness of sins."

    Cont...
    MamaBee07

    Answer by MamaBee07 at 2:54 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • Here's a 'layans' description of what "transubstation" is to Catholics:

    First we believe the bread and wine have two parts – the “substance” (which is what a thing actually is) and the “accidents” (the thing’s physical characteristics). With transubstantiation the substances of the bread and the wine are changed into the substances of Christ’s Body and Blood, while the “accidents” (i.e., color, shape, taste, etc.) of the bread and the wine remain unchanged.

    Think how a person is more than just their appearance (gender, hair color, height, etc) but they are a person too (wife, mother, daughter, friend, lawyer, etc.). We can see, hear, feel, touch, and taste another person (well maybe we should wait until we’re married before we taste anyone too much ). But the true substance, the essence of who a person is cannot be experienced with our senses. It can’t be measured scientifically.
    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 3:23 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • And a person can change in two different ways. Their appearance can change – they can cut their hair, grow a beard become disfigured. They can also keep the same outward appearance but change ‘inside’ – become hateful, religious, joyful, etc. Just think of how we all changed as a person once we became a mother. Not just gaining a few pounds and having bigger breasts, but we changed as a person. We might not be able to articulate the change but we know that we are a different person after having a child. The “substance” of the person has changed and been replaced with a new person – the mother of a child.

    And think about death – the instant before death and the instant after death. The body just before death has the identical appearance of the body after death – but we all know that the two are completely different. The ‘accidents’ are retained while the ‘substance’ has left.
    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 3:23 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • Or consider a great work of art. Why is an original Michaelangelo sculpture worth more than a reproduction? The reproduction could look exactly the same and yet it is worth far less. Why? Because the original sculpture is authentic – it’s the actual marble touched by Michaelangelo. He carved it with his very hands using his own creative force. The original has a unique history and is one-of-a-kind. There’s something about the original that can be imitated, but not copied. So the ‘accidents’ can be reproduced but the ‘substance’ cannot.

    So there are two kinds of change that can happen to things – both are real but only one can be seen, heard, felt or experienced with our five senses. So with transubstantiation something authentic and unique happens to the bread and wine. At the consecration the substance becomes the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.
    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 3:24 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • "Real Presence" is more generic and can mean different things to different people. It can mean that the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Christ. But it could also mean that Christ is just generally present when we receive Holy Communion.
    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 3:25 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • the substance is no longer bread and wine, it's Jesus's body and blood.


    isn't that like cannibalism?
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:34 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • isn't that like cannibalism? No. Since Jesus said "This is my Body and this is my blood do this in memory of me." then that is good enough for me. Are you questioning Jesus?

    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 3:43 PM on Nov. 23, 2009