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Rhogam shot question.

Has anyone decided not to get the shot? I did not get it with my first ever. She has the same blood type as me. I got the shot at the hospital two years later because the Drs told me to. I had no idea what it was. At that time I had just had a miscarriage and they told me that it was because I did not get the shot so I took it. I have not taken one since then. I am 26 weeks pregnant and my Dr said I need to get one. I don’t want to. Does anyone know what will happen if I don’t get it? Will the baby be okay? What if I also choose not to get it after pregnancy?

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 6:24 PM on Nov. 23, 2009 in Pregnancy

Answers (6)
  • If something should happen, your antibodies can attack and kill your baby. There is not a risk of this with the first pregnancy because your body has not had a chance to built antibodies but with the second, third or a miscarriage, it gives your body the chance to recognize something different inside you and mark it as "not self". Of course this can only happen if your blood and the babies blood can mix, and that happens if the placenta ruptures away from the uterine wall or an amino to name a few ways the blood can mix. I would not take the chance and just get the shot as recommended.  You should have the shot during and after any pregnancy if your and the babies Rh factor are opposite. It helps to prevent your body from making antibodies against the baby's blood type.

    midnightmoma

    Answer by midnightmoma at 6:35 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • Just get it done it can cause problems for you and your unborn baby during delivery if your babies blood type is different then yours.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:36 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • OP here- Other than "IF" the blood mixes from the reasons mentioned above. Does your blood mix with the babies blood after birth? Im NOT getting the shot for a few reasons so im scared and want to know what is going to happen. Thanks ladies
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:40 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • Google Rh factor and it will answer all of your questions, blood does mix during delivery in most cases, the actual mechanisms of how I am unsure about. Don't be scared, be informed. Read all you can then decide if you want the shot or not, the shot is used to desensitizes the antibodies that you have, it does not cross the placenta to the baby.

    midnightmoma

    Answer by midnightmoma at 6:58 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • did a quick google and found that your baby may need a blood transfusion in the womb or right after birth if you are Rh- and the baby is Rh+ and you haven't had the shot. You should talk to your doctor about any concerns you have with this shot. I won't ask your reasons for not wanting the shot but if it was for the health and safety of my child I'd do it. Okay end of lecture.


    Here are some resources for you to read


     Mayo Clinic http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/rh-factor/AN00566


    American Pregnancy Association  http://www.americanpregnancy.org/pregnancycomplications/rhfactor.html


     


     

    chrissmom734

    Answer by chrissmom734 at 9:46 PM on Nov. 23, 2009

  • You really should get it. It keeps your anibodies from attacking your fetus!!!! You're antibodies are there to protect your body, if something that is foreign to them enter into you(baby) they attack it. I have not heard anything bad about taking the shot. I've had it with my last two and will get it with this one.
    http://www.justmommies.com/articles/rh_negative.shtml
    When Rh negative blood is exposed to Rh positive blood the Rh negative person begins producing antibodies to fight the invading blood. Antigens trigger your body to produce antibodies. Antibodies are usually a good thing & serve to protect a person from foreign invaders. Now the problem lies when a pregnant woman is carrying a baby that is Rh positive. If the mother has antibodies to the Rh antigen, those antibodies can attack the baby's red blood cells. This can lead to complications to the baby including anemia, jaundice, & other blood related problems.
    Rachell9503

    Answer by Rachell9503 at 12:22 AM on Nov. 24, 2009

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