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How Do I Go About Getting Part of a Law Changed or Overturned and Revised?

It's a state law, not a federal law. I am wondering if there is a way to get the current law changed or overturned and revised. The law, as it stands now, is wrong on many levels. I will elaborate more if asked, but I merely want to know how I would go about pushing to get the law changed and revised.

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randi1978

Asked by randi1978 at 5:42 PM on Nov. 24, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Level 4 (43 Credits)
Answers (16)
  • idk..but im curious?
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 5:45 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

  • It starts with your local legislator...you need to outline to that person what the problem is and see about getting a new law overturning the old law passed. That takes time.

    OR...you can file a legal challenge if there are grounds such as a violation of rights. That takes longer but can be done.
    gdiamante

    Answer by gdiamante at 5:47 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

  • It's the state adoption laws pertaining to newborn adoptions (not foster care). As it stands now a woman still pregnant can sign away her rights and can revoke consent only within 48 hrs of birth, in writing(keep in mind, mom may still be in the hospital in this timeframe). In the day and age where most births occur via c-section, women are often still drugged and lucid from surgery, often unable to revoke consent. The lawmaker who passed this law even admitted that it was to ensure birthfamilies cannot change their mind after the drugs, shock or hormones wore off.

    This is it, in a nutshell. I want it changed to where TPR cannot be signed until the mother is discharged from the hospital and allow at least a week before the adoption is finalized and irrevokable.
    randi1978

    Answer by randi1978 at 6:01 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

  • I thought that a woman who gives up her child for adoption has six months in which she can change her mind and ask for her baby back. At least it is that way in many states. I am friends with a couple who adopted an infant and they all bonded , felt that the child was theirs and suddenly , about 2 months later,the birth Mother asked for the baby back. It was tough and they have given up trying again.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:22 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

  • Definitely go to a legislator, Randi. A birth parents' rights group would be ideal.

    I perosnally believe that rights shoudl not be signed away till six months, and babies in foster care till then. Perhaps because that's how it was done with my brother and me. Nobody got a newborn. (And yes, we bonded just fine.)
    gdiamante

    Answer by gdiamante at 6:27 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

  • I don't agree with putting the child in foster care because it has been proven that being passed around too many caregivers can cause future issues. While I believe that a woman should attempt to parent first before making an adoption plan, I know this won't go over well.

    I gave up a child. I gave birth to her on a Saturday, emergency c-section. By mid day the following Monday, she was legally the adoptive couple's child. I wasn't cleared for discharged until Monday evening. In those 48 hrs, I was on so many painkillers, I didn't know up from down. I wasn't given the chance to revoke consent because I was beyond loopy. I found out there are several birthmothers here in my city that have voiced the same opinions, but none of us know where to start. If anything, we want it changed so TPR cannot be signed until AFTER momma gets out of the hospital and has had a chance to settle.
    randi1978

    Answer by randi1978 at 6:39 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

  • with all due respect, op, why couldn't you make up your mind about adoption throughout your pregnancy? what changed after the birth of your child that you suddenly felt you could financially and/or emotionally support your child? of the women I know who gave up their children, they knew the day the found out they were pregnant that they would be unable to raise this child, and never wavered in their position.


    i was the first child for my mother (age 24 at the time) and she chose to give me up through catholic charities for 8 months, then (because the laws were so loose back in the late 60's), she managed to get me back. she wasn't married, was living with her parents, had no job, and was in school until I was 3--but somehow she was seen as the "best person" to raise me--which couldn't have been further from the truth. i haven't spoken to her in almost 12 years. it does affect children--more than you know.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 8:14 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

  • Because nobody knows how they are going to feel exactly until that baby is out of their body and in their arms. That's why. Finances are never a good enough reason to surrender, and until that baby is in the mother's arms, she will not know if she can emotionally handle it or not.

    The point is that you cannot sign away your rights to someone that isn't born, yet. Most states make it clear that TRP signed prior to birth is not legally binding for the above mentioned reasons. Most states say the woman has to be discharged and out of the hospital before she can sign away her child, to ensure that this is what she wants to do. To tell someone 'you had nine months to decide" is a slap in the face. Emotions and feelings can change drastically between month one up until birth, and nobody knows how they will truly feel until they hold their baby.
    randi1978

    Answer by randi1978 at 8:54 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

  • I gave up a child. I gave birth to her on a Saturday, emergency c-section. By mid day the following Monday, she was legally the adoptive couple's child. I wasn't cleared for discharged until Monday evening. In those 48 hrs, I was on so many painkillers, I didn't know up from down


    You didn't make the decision to give your baby up while on the pills. You decided long before then, that's why there were papers there to sign and a waiting family. What about your situation changed the moment you were released from the hospital?

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:10 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

  • But I signed the papers at 7 months preggo. Before she was born. You cannot sign away your rights to someone who isn't born yet. By law, that person doesn't legally exist, so how can you sign them away? That's what I am getting at. Also the fact that, as mentioned before, a person's emotional state changes drastically upon birth. The woman isn't going to know how she will really feel until she holds that baby. CPS can't even terminate a parents' rights to a baby still in utero, so how can domestic adoption allow that?
    randi1978

    Answer by randi1978 at 11:19 PM on Nov. 24, 2009

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