Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Anti-War Activist Mounts GOP Campaign for Congress, thoughts?

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) had barely begun to give his acceptance speech at the 2008 Republican National Convention when a clamor went up in the upper levels of St. Paul’s XCel Center. Adam Kokesh, a marine who had become a leader of Iraq Veterans Against the War, stood up and unfurled a banner with two sides. On the first side: “YOU CAN’T WIN AN OCCUPATION.” On the other side: “MCCAIN VOTES AGAINST VETS.”
Security guards went into action and dealt with Kokesh’s banner; an irritated crowd of Republicans chanted “USA” until the banner was removed. McCain moved right on, but Kokesh hadn’t finished yet.

“I’m grateful to the president of the United States for leading us in these dark days following the worst attack in American history,” said McCain.

“Ask McCain why he votes against veterans!” shouted Kokesh.

Answer Question
 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 11:55 AM on Dec. 18, 2009 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
Answers (7)
  • http://washingtonindependent.com/71424/anti-war-activist-mounts-gop-campaign-for-congress

    “The ground has really shifted away from the neocon agenda,” Kokesh told TWI during a break in his campaign schedule. “There was no influx of young people getting into the Republican Party to support John McCain. By contrast, Ron Paul brought a huge number of young people into the Republican Party. It’s really exciting to see that happening again with my campaign.”

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 11:56 AM on Dec. 18, 2009

  • Kokesh’s move into electoral politics–he is 27 years old, and this is his first stab at campaigning–unifies two trends that have made the GOP that will fight the midterm elections dramatically different than the one Kokesh used to protest. The first is the rise of Ron Paul’s libertarianism. After years of obscurity, Paul came out of the 2008 elections with a national fundraising base and new respect for his ideas about war and economics among Republican activists and voters. The second trend is the Tea Party movement. After feeling ignored by George W. Bush’s Republicans, the conservative base has come together to demand commitment to the Constitution, commitment to small government values, and guarantees of national and state sovereignty.
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 11:57 AM on Dec. 18, 2009

  • “He never had an official role in the campaign, but we could count on him to energize people,” said Jesse Benton, Paul’s spokesman. Kokesh was a late edition to Paul’s 2008 “Rally for the Republic,” an event meant to “bring the Republican Party back to its roots” held in Minneapolis before McCain’s address to the RNC in 2008.

    “I’d like to think that this symbolizes some good old-fashioned traditional conservatism making a comeback in the GOP,” said Benton. “Republicans have seen that running as the ‘war party’ is a loser for them.”

    Today, Kokesh argues that the efforts of Paul supporters look more or less successful. Bush-era “neocons” are out of the political mainstream, replaced by people like him. “Our nation is drifting dangerously from freedom to fascism,” Kokesh said at a July 2008 rally for Paul in Washington, D.C.;
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 11:58 AM on Dec. 18, 2009

  • at a 2007 Senate hearing, he was photographed holding up a tally of how many times then-Attorney General Alberto Gonzales had said “I don’t recall.” But rhetoric that sounded out of the mainstream that year sounds perfectly in line with the comments of Republicans like Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) or Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), and criticism of the GOP or the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are no longer controversial in the party’s grassroots.

    “If you want to compare to Washington, yes, I’m a radical extremist,” Kokesh told TWI. “If you want to compare me to normal American values, I’m right in the middle of the road. I’m finding out that the grassroots of both parties are so grossly misrepresented by their representatives in Washington that we have more in common with each other.”
    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 11:58 AM on Dec. 18, 2009

  • NM politics are laughable. The corruption and graft at every level is widespread. Most (not all) of the politicians really do a cruddy job. This guy can't be any worse; if nothing else he is more interesting than the usual candidates. Besides, we need someone anti-war in Congress.
    mancosmomma

    Answer by mancosmomma at 12:18 PM on Dec. 18, 2009

  • NM politics are laughable. The corruption and graft at every level is widespread. Most (not all) of the politicians really do a cruddy job. This guy can't be any worse; if nothing else he is more interesting than the usual candidates. Besides, we need someone anti-war in Congress.


    In red...I don't think that is limited to party or NM!! lol

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 12:25 PM on Dec. 18, 2009

  • Honestly Sweet, NM is much worse than any of the other states I've lived in, and I've lived all over the country.
    mancosmomma

    Answer by mancosmomma at 12:29 PM on Dec. 18, 2009

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.
close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN