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To the Judeo Practitioners /(non-pagans)

Some questions are asked here about Pagans show a severe lack of understanding/knowledge of what Pagans actually believe and practice. So I'd like to know exactly what you envision when you hear certain terms.
I'd like you to define these as best as your able. Not by what you spiritually believe, but by what you've learned through CM and the net.

What is Paganism?
What is Wicca?
What are spells?
Do Pagans practice sacrifices?

This is to show me exactly who is misinformed. Perhaps this will help to educate some misconceptions.

 
SalemWitchChild

Asked by SalemWitchChild at 5:55 PM on Jan. 10, 2010 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 23 (15,594 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (13)
  • What is Paganism? from what ive learned/studied it includes a lot of different beliefs, mostly polytheistic & worshiping the male & female aspects of the divine. often anything not Abrahamic in origins is called Pagan.
    What is Wicca? a form of witchcraft that uses magick, has a "harm none" philosophy, & worships the beauty of nature (im not positive about that last one!). Wicca is Pagan, but not all Pagans are Wiccan.
    What are spells? kinda like prayers...sending positive energy thru rituals to achieve a goal.
    Do Pagans practice sacrifices? not in modern times. there were some Pagan faiths that sacrificed thousands of years ago, but Pagans weren't the only faiths that had sacrifices back then...it was a common practice.
    okmanders

    Answer by okmanders at 8:30 PM on Jan. 10, 2010

  • The question title struck me-- to be fair Kabalah is a Judeo-based magical practice! Folks who practice it may consider themselves to be witches, like my hubby. And the first written account of fairies is in Kabalistic texts. Notice I say written.

    There are Judeo-Christian witches. Many many of them. Just playing "devils advocate." HAHAHahaha! I'm so punny!
    ecodani

    Answer by ecodani at 6:00 PM on Jan. 10, 2010

  • Kabbalahisn't a magical practice from the traditional form. There is form of Kabbalah that uses magic and such, but it isn't the same as traditional Kabbalah


    Watch this: What is Kabbalah?

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:46 PM on Jan. 10, 2010

  • Its a good question. I don't know very much about any of the above practices. I always thought of paganism as a form of polytheism. Wicca as people who worship things to do with nature. Truthfully I don't know very much about the various groups.

    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 6:55 PM on Jan. 10, 2010

  • What is Paganism? It is a broad term that means any religion that is outside of the Judeo-faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam. Sometimes is connected more to nature based religions and goddess religions


    What is Wicca? Wicca is a form of paganism that is fairly newer, they follow the Wiccan Rede and focus on the God and the Goddess


    What are spells? Spells are like prayers but they are more than just words, they use energies


    Do Pagans practice sacrifices? Not anymore.


    mommy2

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:57 PM on Jan. 10, 2010

  • Interesting video on Kabbalah, mostly I just learned the correct way to pronounce Kabbahah:-) I wonder how these forces that were spoken about on the video are studied. Has anyone taken the free course offered by the Bnei group in the video?
    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 7:02 PM on Jan. 10, 2010

  • What is Paganism?>>>> a multiple number of religions, ranging from Wicca or old native american religions, to greek and roman religions, and so on and so forth. Some believe in a number of Gods and/or Goddesses, some relate to one, and some believe one for all and all is one. A number of them are nature based religions, and most share a common three fold or karma like rule. There really isn't enough space to define each individually here, lol. Because there is soo much to share about each.
    What is Wicca? Wicca is a nature based Pagan religion. It is new age. Started around the 50's. A mix of older religions and newer ideals. Gardner(sp?) was a big named Wiccan who helped many "come out of the closet" back in the 50's without as much prosecution. There is obviously a lot more to the religion, but again, there isn't a lot of space here. This is just very simple basics of Wicca. Believe in many Gods/esses.
    xxhazeldovexx

    Answer by xxhazeldovexx at 10:43 PM on Jan. 10, 2010

  • Wiccans also have different "denominations". Some following Gardners teachings other's stemming into their own. Some are solitary practitioners while others practice in covens.

    What are spells?>>> They are similar to pray. Most cast a circle, consisting of the north, south, east and west, (representing the fire, air, water, and earth) many do this with candles who's colors represent the symbols. Doing so is like casting a place of protection. Similar to a Christian going to church to pray. After that, you call to the God/ess of whom you wish to connect with... and "cast your spell" which is little different from a Christian kneeling to pray. The idea behind it are all the same really. Just getting there is different.
    xxhazeldovexx

    Answer by xxhazeldovexx at 10:47 PM on Jan. 10, 2010

  • Do Pagans practice sacrifices? >> no.. but some do offer, offerings. Example, some may have mead offerings for some of their solstice rituals. Little different than a Catholic with their crackers and wine. Catholics look at the crackers as the body of Christ, and the wine as his blood. They are representations. Mead is fermented honey and water.. nature actually makes this without man.. which is why is a good drink to drink in most Nature-based Pagan rituals. Simply representations.
    xxhazeldovexx

    Answer by xxhazeldovexx at 10:54 PM on Jan. 10, 2010

  • :

    * RyansMom001: well, what you know seems to be a good start better than some of what I've heard from people, lol. :)
    xxhazeldovexx

    Answer by xxhazeldovexx at 10:56 PM on Jan. 10, 2010