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sickle trait.....

my daughter has sickle trait... I'm not sure if I carry it or not her dad hasn't been around and refuses to communicate with me at all. I'm at every appointment by myself and it seems to me that they keep trying to bring up the fact that I should be honest about her fathers race. I'm white and her fathers white why are they acting like this only affects african americans?

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 1:13 PM on Jan. 19, 2010 in Babies (0-12 months)

Answers (7)
  • "Who is at risk of sickle cell disease?
    sickle cell disease is very common among people from Africa, including African-Americans. It is most common in West Africa. sickle cell disease also occurs in Mediterranean countries, some parts of the Middle East, central India and some Latin American countries. Although it is uncommon, a Caucasian person could have sickle cell disease."

    http://www.intellihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSS/14294/48780.html

    tntmom1027

    Answer by tntmom1027 at 1:17 PM on Jan. 19, 2010

  • My son has sickle cell and we go to a sickle cell clinic. They have said many times it effects primarily African Americans, however white people can be effected too and carrying the trait and having sickle cell are two different things
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:31 PM on Jan. 19, 2010

  • *OP*
    thank you for pointing out the difference I have read up quite a bit about both. I'm probably just bothered by the fact that the doctor has no answers for my questions... like- I know it's possible for someone with just the trait to develop symptoms so what should I look for? and I have seen ERD brought up in connection with the trait. All the dr says to me is perhaps somewhere in my family past someone abused a slave...or her dads african american and doesn't know it. It just seems closed minded to me. Carrying the trait is somewhat common and most don't even know they carry it.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:39 PM on Jan. 19, 2010

  • OMG that Dr is disturbing! You need to find a Doctor who specializes in sickle cell, I cannot stress that enough. A doctor that is not educated about the disease will not know the proper way to treat it, we have run into that problem one too many times. Our son takes penicilin everyday, twice a day and will for most likely the rest of his life. He also needs special treatment during ER or regular doctors visits because of sickle cell. Someone at our sickle cell clinic is always on call to answer questions if we are at a regular clinic. There are so many things to know! Just see if you can find a specialist.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:46 PM on Jan. 19, 2010

  • This is the general office number to my son's sickle cell clinic in Chicago. 773-880-4618. I don't know where you live but you could ask if they know of one in your area or maybe they could give you to the nurse there (she is wonderful and been there for years and knows everything about sickle cell) and she could answer some basic questions for you.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:50 PM on Jan. 19, 2010

  • *OP*
    thank you for your response.. I know she just carries the trait but I still have questions.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:10 PM on Jan. 19, 2010

  • You need to take your child to a dr who specializes in genetic blood disorders. Your dr's office should give you information and set up the first appt for you. Just because a blood disorder commonly occurs in a certain people group does not mean that if you have it, you have an ancestor that belonged to that group. It just means that that group is most frequently diagnosed and catalogued as having it. It is very important that you find a specialist, and don't just go to a gp. My mom and brothers have a rare form of spherocytosis, which is in the sickle cell family of blood disorders, and they have always gone to a gp, and doing so almost resulted in my older brother not having an important surgery and developing congestive organ failure, all because statistically, he could "live with it". He got the surgery anyway and we all noticed the difference. So find a dr who knows, not one that looks at statistics.
    preacherskid

    Answer by preacherskid at 2:16 PM on Jan. 19, 2010

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