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Could Wind Turbines be inefficient as an energy resource...

...in cold areas. The state invested in alternative energy sources and (over a period of many years) spent $3.3 million on eleven wind turbines..

Guess what? Those pricey wind turbines? They don’t work in cold weather.

So, what is the fix? Either electricity or natural gas at each turbine to keep the mechanism lubricated.

Counter Productive? Would you say wind turbines might be inefficient as an energy resource in cold areas? And where were the scientists who tested this BEFORE the money was spent?

Answer Question
 
grlygrlz2

Asked by grlygrlz2 at 8:07 AM on Feb. 1, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 39 (106,530 Credits)
Answers (9)
  • Should the state have purchased less wind turbines and tested them FIRST before the massive investment? Do you think wind turbines are better as a secondary power source in this nation?


    What do you say, just not reliable enough as a primary energy resource to replace coal/natural gas-generated electricity?

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 8:11 AM on Feb. 1, 2010

  • It appears that we have jumped right out and tried to get all the tax breaks and incentives offered for the "green" energy without realizing that, as a nation, we are not schooled in the technology. Of course there are places in the US that have used the technology for years; however, they haven't shared their pluses and deltas with the rest of us. The craziest wind power issue I heard was states that passed laws to prohibit the power lines to be drawn to the turbines. You can put them up, but you can't distribute the power. These are strange times.

    jesse123456

    Answer by jesse123456 at 8:11 AM on Feb. 1, 2010

  • Yes and No. It depends on the contracts and what the prices are for other fuels resources at the time. When NG hit an all time high of about $5 a unit Wind was lookin cheap. With C&T driving up coal costs, wind was still lookin cheap. Overall, it was the excitement about wind and the big boys on top like T.B.Pickens gathering up hard to buy turbines and contracting with the few people in this country able to construct and commission one or 100. Wind turbines are a good source of electricity when placed in areas like OK with a constant wind of at least 35mph in high altitudes, you can't have them just anywhere. So I say, put them where we can and where the people want them. If you want to see new and efficient look into Hydro Turbines, now being placed on the bottom of the Ocean. Instead of Wind, they use natureal ocean currents to produce electricity. It flows all the time, no noise, no unsightly horizon to view.
    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 8:19 AM on Feb. 1, 2010

  • You can put them up, but you can't distribute the power. These are strange times
    -----------------------------------------
    This is a whole nother story, and is all about who has contracts to use those lines. Just because a new unit is put up somewhere to produce electricity, that doesn't automatically mean they can pump it onto the grid. The grid is under constant contract with producers at certain hours and peak times of the day. It's alot more complicated then just producing and sending it out somewhere. It all has to go through contracts and dispatching and regulations of how much is being sent out and when and to whom.
    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 8:22 AM on Feb. 1, 2010

  • PA passed a law that the power lines could not be strung across their state. That isn't just getting power to the grid. That is stopping the power at the source. It is just another example of using a technology that we aren't prepared to use, want to use, or is cost effiecent to use.
    jesse123456

    Answer by jesse123456 at 8:40 AM on Feb. 1, 2010

  • PA passed a law that the power lines could not be strung across their state
    ------------------------------------------
    Do they intend to only have buried cables in the future? I think there is much more involved with that then just stopping the power delivery. The wind turbines could tie on as long as they had a viewable contract with sold power and a dispatching agency. More lines are not needed to add additional power, just more regulation of where it's going and when and to whom. If they had questionable contracts for production, or if they were deemed an unreliable source, that would also cause a dismissal of their request to tie on.
    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 8:49 AM on Feb. 1, 2010

  • It must be a line issue. Here............2/01/10

    SPEAKING OF WINDMILLS, FIRST ENERGY, THE PARENT FIRM OF PENELEC IS NOW A PARTY TO A 23 YEAR AGREEMENT TO BUY 34.5 MILLION MEGAWATTS OF OUT PUT FROM THE CASSELMAN WIND POWER PROJECT BEING DEVELOPED IN SOMERSET COUNTY BY PPM ENERGY. CONSTRUCTION OF THE CASSELMAN PROJECT IS SET FOR NEXT SUMMER TO BE COMPLETED BY THIS TIME NEXT YEAR. THE PROJECT WILL FEATURE 23 WIND TURBINES RATED AT 1.5 MEGAWATTS EACH. THE CASSELMAN PROJECT ENCOMPASSES 2000 ACRES. IT WAS AWARDED A GRANT FROM THE PA DEPT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION BECAUSE IT WILL USE SEVERAL HUNDRED ACRES OF RECLAIMED SURFACE MINE AREAS. THE PROJECT ALSO RECEIVED A PRODUCTION INCENTIVE GRANT FROM THE TRF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FUND. 60 JOBS ARE EXPECTED TO BE CREATED



    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 9:00 AM on Feb. 1, 2010

  • ***sorry, I meant to type It must NOT be a line issue.
    But anyway, that report is from Dec of 2006 but for some reason came up today on a periodical. I can't find anything stating PA has laws restricting overhead power lines.
    Tell me where this happened, and I could probably find out why exactly that project was mothballed.
    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 9:07 AM on Feb. 1, 2010

  • Wind turbines, like solar power, have time issues and weather issues. They cannot produce power 24-7-365. Unfortunately, we humans use power 24-7-365. They cannot sustain a city without back-up, and we don't have reliable enough battery technology to store the energy.

    As much as I love the idea, they will never be enough to support a power-hungry society.
    mancosmomma

    Answer by mancosmomma at 10:35 AM on Feb. 1, 2010

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