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Faith vs. Fact; A hypothetical situation

For the purpose of the question, I'm using the word "god", but by that I mean any deity of any religion. That said, I don't believe in god, because I have no reason to. God has never spoken to me, made himself known to me in any way. However, if god was to appear to me in some way and I knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that it was god, I would believe, because I would have a reason to.
For those who DO believe: if it could be proven, somehow, that there WAS no god; would you still believe? Yes, I know there is no way to prove either of those things; this is purely hypothetical. If there was %100, no-doubt-about-it, scientific PROOF, would it change your belief, or would you cling to it? Explain why.
Please don't respond with "that would never happen!!" I just said it's impossible to prove. I'm looking for honest answers, not a lecture, please. I'm really curious.

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Koukla12905

Asked by Koukla12905 at 10:03 AM on Feb. 7, 2010 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 15 (2,114 Credits)
Answers (24)
  • Yes, And No... Would I continue to believe in a physical God - No, that wouldn't be very smart. But would I still believe in the basic power of the Gods? Yes. The idea of a God is not just a belief in an outside being. It's also the belief in self, for me. I have a strong belief in my Gods because I see their work in my life. So with proof that they aren't really there, I would still have to believe in that strength, that power - in ME! It would just prove to me that God is inside all of us.
    SabrinaMBowen

    Answer by SabrinaMBowen at 10:09 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

  • most of them believe that "God" created science, so.... it would be a little hard to prove to them that the god who created what is being used to disprove his existence would in fact do so- but more plausable in their severely warped and damaged minds, that the devis is trying to fool them.
    On the flip side, about 1/3 of them believe that science is satanic, and is the false teaching of the antichrist.

    I'll offer my POV, though I am an atheist- IF (astronomically HUGE if) there was proof beyond the shadow of doubt that a higher power of some form, beyond the forces of nature (which IS the higher power on this planet), exists- I would have to alter my personal acceptance to include that factual knowledge. Since it does not however, exist in any way, shape, or form... I still stand firm to the statement that they are mentally ill.
    ObbyDobbie

    Answer by ObbyDobbie at 10:17 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

  • Please Ignore my pytos- waiting for headache meds and caffeine to kick in.
    ObbyDobbie

    Answer by ObbyDobbie at 10:21 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

  • This is a trick question. Someone who has faith has their proof. Someone who needs physical proof will never have faith. Trick question. Impossible to answer and to arrive at any point of agreement.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:28 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

  • 1. its not impossible, its improbable.


    There is more than one way to skin a cat; Facts/proof is never one direct way. I think that the existence of God(s), Goddess(es) CAN be just as factual as "scientific proof".


    2.There are plenty of things that science cannot prove, but they know and acknowledge the existence (i.e planet x, alien life, and etc.)


    How does a def/blind/mute know when someone is approaching? - They can feel it.


    As the Christians say, "Faith comes by hearing", if you have faith you can make anything you feel attached to (a) God/dess. But, if you reject all logic, you KNOW when something/ someone is real/present.

    sugahmamma

    Answer by sugahmamma at 10:29 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

  • If there were a scientific, physical proof that what believers claims is true, then yes I would accept the fact. But so far, from my observation god or gods are created only in people's minds and they believe in what they want to believe, like someone or something will save them from disaster, while it may only be work of other people like police, paramedics, fire fighters during let's say serious car accident or like the natural disaster that happened in New Orleans. BTW, it bothers me when people thank god for being saved in situations like that instead of being grateful for above mentioned 'saviours' and giving them the credit.
    BeaMoore

    Answer by BeaMoore at 10:31 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

  • "most of them believe that "God" created science, so.... it would be a little hard to prove to them that the god who created what is being used to disprove his existence would in fact do so"

    good point.. isn't that sort of along the lines of "the bible says god exists, and god wrote the bible"?
    Koukla12905

    Answer by Koukla12905 at 10:32 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

  • 3. The God/dess(es) that I honor are all personifications of nature itself, so I dont see how they could be disproved, BUT hypothetically speaking, if they were disproved, I would not still believe.


     

    sugahmamma

    Answer by sugahmamma at 10:34 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

  • "This is a trick question. Someone who has faith has their proof. Someone who needs physical proof will never have faith. Trick question. Impossible to answer and to arrive at any point of agreement. "

    Well, I didn't intend it to be a trick question! :) But to say someone with faith has their proof seems an oxymoron to me... isn't the basis of "faith" believing in something which CANNOT be proven? To me, someone saying "the bible says so", or "I feel god is real" isn't proof.
    Koukla12905

    Answer by Koukla12905 at 10:37 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

  • By their very definitions, faith and proof cannot mutually coexist. If you have proof of something, you cannot also have faith in it. Once you have the concrete knowledge of something, it no longer meets the definition of something you are capable of having faith in. (you can think there is a table in another room, and have faith there is a table, but once you go in the room and see the table, you can no longer have faith in the table because you now have concrete knowledge of the table and that cannot be taken away. It's there, you know it, there is no longer such a thing as faith in the table). The reverse would also be true, if it were possible to prove a negative. Problem is, you cannot prove a negative, so it would never happen. But if you could, it would also negate the concept of faith, because by definition, you cannot have faith about a fact.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 10:39 AM on Feb. 7, 2010

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