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Do you know the actual definition of co-sleeping?

 
lady-J-Rock

Asked by lady-J-Rock at 1:21 PM on Feb. 11, 2010 in Just for Fun

Level 11 (592 Credits)
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Answers (13)
  • Cosleeping is sleeping in close proximity to your child, whether that be in a bassinet near your bed, or in your bed, or in a sidecar. Bed sharing is when baby is IN your bed.
    Krysta622

    Answer by Krysta622 at 3:07 PM on Feb. 11, 2010

  • Is Cosleeping Safe?


    Despite the possible pros, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) warns parents not to place their infants to sleep in adult beds, stating that the practice puts babies at risk of suffocation and strangulation. And the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) agrees.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:49 PM on Feb. 11, 2010

  • yes
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:49 PM on Feb. 11, 2010

  • Big mistake???
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:52 PM on Feb. 11, 2010

  • OK what is the true definition of co sleeping?
    lady-J-Rock

    Answer by lady-J-Rock at 2:04 PM on Feb. 11, 2010

  • My daughter slept in my waterbed with me and was just fine. No one should sleep soundly when they have the baby in their bed because it could be dangerous, especially if there are two people.
    sharonfuller

    Answer by sharonfuller at 2:09 PM on Feb. 11, 2010

  • ok Sharon that is not a definition of it.
    lady-J-Rock

    Answer by lady-J-Rock at 2:25 PM on Feb. 11, 2010

  • Co-sleeping, also called the family bed, is a practice in which babies and young children sleep with one or both parents, as opposed to a separate infant bed. It is standard practice in many parts of the world, and is practiced by a significant minority in countries where infant beds are also used.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:34 PM on Feb. 11, 2010

  • One study reported mothers getting more sleep by co-sleeping and breastfeeding than by other arrangements.[8]

    It has been argued that co-sleeping evolved over five million years, that it alters the infant's sleep experience and the number of maternal inspections of the infant, and that it provides a beginning point for considering possibly unconventional ways of helping reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).[9][10]

    Stress hormones are lower in mothers and babies who co-sleep, specifically the balance of the stress hormone cortisol, the control of which is essential for a baby's healthy growth.[11][12][13][14]

    In studies with animals, infants who stayed close to their mothers had higher levels of growth hormones and enzymes necessary for brain and heart growth.[15][16]

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:36 PM on Feb. 11, 2010

  • nope anon your wrong.
    lady-J-Rock

    Answer by lady-J-Rock at 3:05 PM on Feb. 11, 2010