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60-80 % of women who try VBAC have a successful vaginal delivery

According to the Mayo Clinic, 60-80 percent of women who try VBAC (vaginal birth after Caesarean) have a successful vaginal delivery.

Why do they say "...have a successful vaginal delivery"? Is this uppossed to an "unsuccessful vaginal delivery"? The word successful is just unnecessary.

Also, the term "trial of labor" shouldn't be thrown in the faces of just VBAC moms. IMO, every woman in labor is getting their "trial of labor"...they just don't know it yet.

If a hospital has a 40% c-section rate and a VBAC mom has a 60-80% chance of giving birth vaginally, then, statistically, a VBAC mom has a better chance of having a vaginal birth that the lady in the room next door. Whaddaya think?

Answer Question
 
CafeMomBinky

Asked by CafeMomBinky at 2:10 PM on Feb. 13, 2010 in Pregnancy

Level 4 (54 Credits)
Answers (11)
  • I had three babies three sections one labor first time resulting in my first section. My first delivery I trusted friends recommendations and didn't like dr. after all I went through during pregnancy and delivery. For second and third babies I trusted only myself by interviewing doctors and hospitals personally with my concerns and my wants and needs.

    Any doctor or hospital's labor/delivery who couldn't take time for me wasn't the doctor or hospital for me.

    I did't worry about what other moms thought of my choices I did what was best for each baby and me.

    Statistics aren't there in the office visits and hospitals, there only there afterwards.
    lfl

    Answer by lfl at 2:19 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

  • Hooray statistics!!

    Does this study only chart in-hospital births or does it include ALL forms of out-of-hospital births (home, birthing center)? My midwife practice has a much higher rate of VBAC than 80%-- she's at like 99%.

    I think VBAC seekers are more likely to refuse medical intervention and have a doc/ midwife who supports their choice.
    ecodani

    Answer by ecodani at 2:21 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

  • And yet c-sections are the most commonly performed surgery in the United States. Women need to start educationg themselves and saying to no to unneccesary medical treatment.

    And they say successful because it either didn't end in a c-section or there were no complications.
    SaraP1989

    Answer by SaraP1989 at 2:24 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

  • "I think VBAC seekers are more likely to refuse medical intervention and have a doc/ midwife who supports their choice."

    I was thinking this, too.
    Many moms who want a VBAC have to put in some hours of self-education, get support, advocacy... The other moms might not usually put that much effort & preparation into working for the safest outcome.

    The word successful implies she got what she was working for. I agree that saying a TOL only weakens a mom's confidence. But that can be a subliminal intention, too.
    doulala

    Answer by doulala at 2:28 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

  • you know, I wonder if there were more midwives even with obs combined both in practice, there might be less sections. Had there been midwives in an ob practice or in a hospital as a group of midwives themselves practicing in a hospital, when I had any of my kids I probably would have gone to one.

    I chose obs cuz I didn't want a midwife, I wanted group of midwives as backup for each other with backup obs in their practice.
    That scenario is more available now just after my baby days.
    lfl

    Answer by lfl at 3:11 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

  • Statistics aren't there in the office visits and hospitals, there only there afterwards.

    Very good point. T/Y
    _______________

    Does this study only chart in-hospital births or does it include ALL forms of out-of-hospital births (home, birthing center)? My midwife practice has a much higher rate of VBAC than 80%-- she's at like 99%.

    I believe this is a national average to include home & midwifery birthing facilities. This is also the rate listed on my hospital's "VBAC Consent Form".
    _____________________________

    I did't worry about what other moms thought of my choices I did what was best for each baby and me.

    I'm not asking for your opinion regarding my decision. I've already made me decision. This question is to get your opinion on how hospitals and OBs scare VBAC moms into thinking that they are (statistically) in a more dangerous position or at a disadvantage, compared to any other laboring woman. :-)
    CafeMomBinky

    Answer by CafeMomBinky at 3:23 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

  • yea i think any mom (vbac or not) who takes care to find a doctor or midwife who respects the natural process of birth, and respects the mom's wishes, has a much lower chance of having a c-section. it's unfortunate that it can sometimes be hard to find a doctor or midwife who does respect natural, normal birth, & instead pushes unnecessary and sometimes dangerous interventions, some of which increase the chances of c-section.
    Stefanie83

    Answer by Stefanie83 at 3:26 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

  • Midwifery practices (CNMs) that are teamed with OBs are more likely to follow the medical model. Many CNMs will have a similar view and style to their counterparts, but some won't...
    CPMs are out-of-hospital and have lower intervention and cesarean statistics. It depends on the CNM-OB practice, I would guess. Midwifery care does decrease the risk for a surgical birth.
    doulala

    Answer by doulala at 3:28 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

  • I'm personally for finding doctors that let women choose period. I had vbac pushed and pushed on me and I didn't want one. I think it's stupid to assume that if you don't want a vbac that you are uneducated. I am educated on vbac and c-section and I wanted another c-section. In the end, I got my c-section but only because I had to put my foot down and demanded that I have the choice to have one. I don't care how you bring your baby into this world but women should have choices. I personally, never want to experience vaginal delivery and that should be my choice.
    legalmommy101

    Answer by legalmommy101 at 3:36 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

  • Midwifery care does decrease the risk for a surgical birth.
    _____________________________________________

    absolutely...t/y

    midwives tend to trust a woman's body and in her natural abilities to give birth. they tend to be more patient and less interventive, practicing standard and not active labor management (they allow labor to progress on it's own). many also use unorthodox techniques to (for example) turn a breech baby or investigate a low fetal heart tone by performing fetal scalp stimulation (tickling baby's head) to wake a (possible) sleeping baby, before moving to a more invasive option.

    t/y
    CafeMomBinky

    Answer by CafeMomBinky at 3:37 PM on Feb. 13, 2010

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