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Moms whose kids were reading before school -

Did they go to a regular Kindergarten class? How did they do once they were in school?

My child has been reading since 3 yrs old. Right now she's reading at a 1st grade level, maybe 2nd. I don't want to put her in school and have her be bored, unchallenged, ostracized, or more...
Are there advanced classes I should ask about?

What were your experiences...any advice?

Answer Question
 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 2:58 PM on Feb. 22, 2010 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

Answers (13)
  • You definitely need to find a gifted (or other academically advanced) program, preferably full time. If you are in Chicago, please contact me offlist, and I will be happy to help you navigate the school system.


    Either way, here are a couple of great resources for you: www.greatschools.org is a database of schools. The Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University is a fantastic resources for parents looking for enrichment classes and other resources: http://www.ctd.northwestern.edu/


    There are a couple of CafeMom groups for moms of gifted children that you may want to check out.

    rkoloms

    Answer by rkoloms at 3:40 PM on Feb. 22, 2010

  • Most schools do not offer gifted programs for kindergartners. Both of my children are advanced. My three year old is also reading on a first grade level. My five year old is a kindergartner this year and reading on a late 2nd grade level. After much researching and talking to local school people, we chose to homeschool. I haven't regretted the decision one bit. He is progressing so well. He has friends in our area's excellent public school, and the things they are doing are shocking. His friend is WAY ahead of her class and is basically being used as a helper for the other kids.

    cont.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:12 PM on Feb. 22, 2010

  • When I talked to the local curriculum coordinator, she said that they wouldn't have any way to track his progress since he was already past everything that would have been learned in kindergarten. My concern wasn't that he would be bored. My concern was that he would learn nothing new. I believe his time is more valuable than that. We never thought we would homeschool, but it has been the best decision for us. He has had time to work on things that really interest him as well as improve his reading, writing and math.

    My mother is a retired public school teacher, and she is our biggest supporter. I also taught in public school, and there are many in our homeschool group that did. Maybe explore what's available in your area, but you can be pretty sure that they won't get what they really need in public school.

    Visit teacher boards like proteacher or a to z teacher forum to read about classroom struggles. It's eye opening.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:15 PM on Feb. 22, 2010

  • When I talked to the local curriculum coordinator, she said that they wouldn't have any way to track his progress since he was already past everything that would have been learned in kindergarten. My concern wasn't that he would be bored. My concern was that he would learn nothing new. I believe his time is more valuable than that. We never thought we would homeschool, but it has been the best thing for us.

    Check out what's available in your area. Visit teacher boards like proteacher or a to z teacher and read their messages about classroom struggles. It's eye opening and makes it obvious that it would be a very rare teacher to be able to give your child what they need. They may want to, but they are just spread tooooooo thin.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:17 PM on Feb. 22, 2010

  • Woops. Sorry for the double post.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:17 PM on Feb. 22, 2010

  • We homeschool too now. The same thing was happening with our son in K as was mentioned above. He was reading/doing math at a higher level than his class. He was coming home bored everyday. We asked the school to challenge him and all they did was having him helping the kids who were having trouble. This also caused problems with his classmates as they resented the fact that another student was helping them.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:05 AM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • My son was reading at 4 and when he started school(he goes to a private school) and they worked with him. They also taught him the corrct ways to read(long and short and all that stuff) I would find a school that is willing to work with you and your child. I did homeschool for the first 1/2 of K untill I found this school. BUt I just do not have the patients to homeschool. I will say that when he started school we didnt focus as muc on the reading because he was learning to read and write in cursive!! But he is still ahead of other kids his age.
    IMAMOM2-2KIDS

    Answer by IMAMOM2-2KIDS at 3:01 AM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • It will depend on the curriculum and the teacher. My oldest read at 2 1/2. My youngest was reading at 3. Both are in public school and neither has had an issue with being bored or unchallenged. They are also both ahead of the curve in math, as well as other subjects. The program curriculum used in our district offers a great deal of flexibility specifically in the reading program. The teachers we've had to date do a fantastic job at keeping advanced kids challenged and engaged. Our school also offers an enrichment program through the gifted-and-talented teacher starting the end of kindergarten.

    Some things we've done in and out of the classroom - class libraries include a wide range of skill level books that can be read during free-time. Kids are given journals and opportunity to write their own stories. Challenge work and extra credit is offered at skill appropriate levels.
    ldmrmom

    Answer by ldmrmom at 11:28 AM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • The other thing I'd add - kindergarten is a lot more than just reading and basic intro to academics. Again, depending on the curriculum program, being advanced may not even come into play at this stage. Our K program, for example, is highly focused on hands-on learning centers and exploration of topics - not worksheets and 'desk-work.' For this reason, even when the subject at hand was something my kids already knew, they were still engaged and enjoying the process. Again, it also meant there was room for the teacher to expand the lesson to meet the needs of students at a variety of skill levels. She could offer more advanced work to those that needed it and more remedial work to those that required such. For example, a reading lesson may encompass a study on Chinese New Year. The work on phonics and basic sight words is a component of the bigger lesson. My DD can read already. The phonics work is not her focus. The subject is
    ldmrmom

    Answer by ldmrmom at 11:33 AM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • Previous anon poster here -- I wasn't concerned with my child being bored. I was concerned with him learning nothing (or much less than he was capable of) while he was wasting his days away learning that B says buh. Yes, there is more to kindergarten than academics. That's another reason we chose not to send him. There are kids that don't know how to sit still, don't know how to get in a peaceful line, can't share, don't know how to interact with other children well, etc. He understands all of that as well.

    I think it's great that you found a teacher that is willing to truly differentiate for your child. That is definitely not the norm though. Many teachers would love to, but the reality is they have tons of kids with problems or deficiencies that are going to get the attention first.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:01 PM on Feb. 23, 2010

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