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Is it inhumane

To get my indoor cat declawed?

I have 2 cats and a small dog -- my older cat is declawed ( by previous owner) I have had my male cat since he was a kitten...and have tried everything to "trim" his nails.....my curtains , couch and me and my kids arms are covered in scratches ....and he hurts the dog and other cat when they play....

Answer Question
 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 5:14 PM on Feb. 23, 2010 in Pets

Answers (12)
  • if he is strictly indoors with you forever maybe. try training
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 5:16 PM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • do not declaw a cat that goes outdoors. claws are important for defense against other cats.
    cassie_m

    Answer by cassie_m at 5:22 PM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • he stays inside...occasioanly I let him on the porch with me...but I would stop doing that.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 5:30 PM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • ohhh I watch my kid's cat while she's jobhunting -it's always been an indoor cat about three years old. She does not want it declawed even though its an indoor cat in case it ever does get out. Every once in a while that can happen unexpectedly.

    Think -without claws if the cat felt safe in a tree no matter what other critters can climb them too -without claws in a strange smelling strange looking environment outside the cat can not defend itself ever not ever at all.

    Try getting a squirt bottle (clean and sterilized in dishwasher) like to mist plants with, and fill it with luke warm tepid water. I trained my dogs like this - put the squirt bottle sprayer on widest spray and when the cat in question approaches baby squirt that cat's shoulder. Do that enough times (keep a bottle in every single room for your easy reach, every single room) and after a while when that cat sees the bottle in hand it will leave be4 squirt.
    lfl

    Answer by lfl at 5:34 PM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • when I trained my dogs w/the squirt bottle as I reached for the bottle I said very firmly and loud but without screaming (cuz I didn't want cat to get afraid).

    Also even though my daughter's cat doesn't live fulltime with me I a scratch post (without cat nip, makes daughter's cat CRAZY) and i put her on it several times a day and gently place her front paws on it in a scratching motion. Maybe try that too.

    Try too putting you cat and litter box in a 'safe' room away from baby and other worries for it to get rest too.

    I have three kids, when my youngest was born we had a dog and cat then. So I know what you're worried about with a baby.
    I did a bit of what I described in my two posts here with them and my youngest. But didn't do it often enough. Try the squirt and scratch post and letting cat have schedule time away from baby and baby away from cat.

    When baby naps you can cuddle, rest with tht cat.

    Declaw not
    lfl

    Answer by lfl at 5:46 PM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • Declawing should only be done as a last resort. There are cases when declawing is necessary though. I would try a spray bottle, side sided tape on the furniture, a can with coins to shake at him and i  would also try different scratching posts before jumping to declawing. If this is a young cat he will settle down.  Declawing really should be done when they are young if it is going to be done at all.

    KyliesMom5

    Answer by KyliesMom5 at 6:19 PM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • I agree why not use a spray bottle I've heard declawing a cat is'nt good. I have a cat that isn't and he did that to my small dog but then my dog just chased him around the house and he tried that with the other but his to hairy and tall and one night he attacked my husbands feet and my husband kicked him off (not on purpose) and he went flying but he never that again. And when he'd nip me I just give him a tap and he goes away
    momtoPMCandJNC

    Answer by momtoPMCandJNC at 8:46 PM on Feb. 23, 2010

  • I've heard they have little rubber things that cover their claws. Ask your vet.
    Deb_Jones

    Answer by Deb_Jones at 7:02 AM on Feb. 24, 2010

  • tough one.BUMP
    annie610

    Answer by annie610 at 9:24 AM on Feb. 24, 2010

  • Get soft claws. Yes I consider cutting off kitty toes for your convenience inhumane.
    SalemWitchChild

    Answer by SalemWitchChild at 4:31 PM on Feb. 24, 2010

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