Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

A twist on another question

Do you know how much your insurance policy will cost per month in an Obama Exchange?

Answer Question
 
itsmesteph11

Asked by itsmesteph11 at 6:51 PM on Mar. 26, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 39 (113,405 Credits)
Answers (13)
  • This is all I could find...just wondering which "half is true!" :o(


    "The CBO estimated that the average premium for people in the individual market would be about 10 percent to 13 percent higher in 2016 than under current law. Specifically, the CBO estimates the average cost of family policies purchased by individuals would be $15,200 in 2016, as opposed to $13,100 under current law."


    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2010/feb/25/barack-obama/obama-says-under-democratic-health-plan-family-ins/


    Seems no one likes to talk SPECIFIC NUMBERS...wonder why that is?! :o)

    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 7:40 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2010/mar/26/health-care-promises-resolved/

    So we'll be updating all of the promises touched by the 2,400-page bill. For now, here are some of the biggies.

    The Kept Promises:

    • No. 51: Require insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions. This was one of the cornerstones of the health care reform bill. The requirement to cover people with pre-existing conditions doesn't fully kick in until 2014. Until then, a new high-risk pool will offer coverage to uninsured people with pre-existing medical problems.

    • No. 53: Give tax credits to those who need help to pay health premiums. One of the most controversial, and certainly the most expensive, provisions of the health care bill is the plan to extend government subsidies through tax credits to help middle and lower income people pay for health insurance, if they don't get it through an employer.

    contd
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 7:44 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • • No. 48: Close the "doughnut hole" in Medicare prescription drug plan. Under current law, prescription expenses between $2,830 and $4,550 are an out-of-pocket expense for Medicare enrollees. That's what's known as the doughnut hole. The hole won't be closed immediately, but the bill will phase it out over the next 10 years.

    • No. 57: Expand eligibility for Medicaid. Under the new law, eligibility for Medicaid will be expanded to all individuals under age 65 with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level, beginning in 2014.

    • No. 56: Require children to have health insurance coverage. One of the changes that goes into effect in 2010 is allowing young adults to continue on their parents policies. The law allows dependents up to age 26 to remain on plans. It also requires all includes an "individual mandate" that requires all individuals (not just children), to obtain insurance. That's scheduled for 2014
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 7:45 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • The Compromises:

    • No. 52: Create a National Health Insurance Exchange. The law calls for the creation of state-based health insurance exchanges, which are virtual marketplaces where people can go to buy health insurance. But during the campaign, Obama, promised to create one national exchange, a significant difference.

    • No. 54: Create a small business tax credit to help with health premiums. In his remarks at the signing of the bill, Obama touted new small business tax credits as one of the immediate benefits of the bill. And the bill would, in fact, phase up to Obama's promise of a tax credit of up to 50 percent on premiums paid by small businesses on behalf of their employees by 2014. But there's one key difference between Obama's promise and what the bill delivers: the tax credit is not refundable -- so if the business' tax liability is less than zero, the government will not be sending a check.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 7:46 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • The Promise Broken:

    • No. 518: Create a public option health plan for a new National Health Insurance Exchange. Remember all of the debate over a public option, a government-run insurance plan on the exchange? It didn't make it into the final bill.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 7:46 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2825548/health_care_reform_bill_2010_through.html?cat=5

    At the present time, we make too much money to receive Medicaid and too little to purchase private insurance. We fall into the $40,000 to $50,000 per year income range. To buy a basic insurance plan for our family would cost us roughly $680 per month as the market currently stands. Sadly, like many other Americans, we live paycheck to paycheck. We would be hard pressed to squeeze $300 per month out of our budget to purchase our own insurance.

    With the new bill, according to a summary put out by CBS News, a family of four would have to make less than $29,327 to qualify for Medicaid. So that option out of the running for my family.

    contd
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 7:49 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • So, I found a health care subsidy calculator, entered the necessary information, and received my estimated subsidy. Under President Obama's proposed subsidy plan, our family's yearly premium would cost a mere $2462 a year, or roughly $205 per month. An entirely affordable plan!

    Link to Calculator:
    http://healthreform.kff.org/SubsidyCalculator.aspx
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 7:50 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • t the present time, we make too much money to receive Medicaid and too little to purchase private insurance. We fall into the $40,000 to $50,000 per year income range.

    ***
    And your employer doesn't offer health insurance?! When I made that level of income (20 years ago) I had excellent health benefits!
    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 7:55 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • Under President Obama's proposed subsidy plan, our family's yearly premium would cost a mere $2462 a year, or roughly $205 per month. An entirely affordable plan!

    You don't get the subsidy until you get your tax return the next year. You still pay $680/month and then after you've paid $8160 for the year, you'll get back your subsidy of $5698 (which is 8160 - 2462). Now, using the CBO's estimate of a 10-13% increase, your subsidy would technically go up, but you would be paying $768.40/month up front.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 7:59 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • You don't get the subsidy until you get your tax return the next year. You still pay $680/month and then after you've paid $8160 for the year, you'll get back your subsidy of $5698 (which is 8160 - 2462). Now, using the CBO's estimate of a 10-13% increase, your subsidy would technically go up, but you would be paying $768.40/month up front.

    ***
    What a BAH-gain!!! Mmm...mmm...mmm.....barack hussein obama
    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 8:03 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.
close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN