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Should the Pope step down?

The former students haven't gone to the police because the 10-year statute of limitations expired. They have asked the priests in question to waive the statute of limitations so a case can be opened, but to date none of them have.

Their stories have found new relevance after revelations that the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith — then led by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, now pope — told Wisconsin bishops in 1998 to shut down a church trial for an elderly priest who allegedly molested 200 deaf boys.

"It's a problem of justice," said Laiti, who has said he was sodomized repeatedly at the boarding school from the age of seven. Earlier in the day, in an interview with Associated Press Television News, Laiti said he wanted his abusers kicked out of the church.

"We want justice for everything we went through, the suffering for all of our life," said Gianni Bisoli, 61,

Answer Question
 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 8:46 PM on Mar. 26, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
Answers (61)
  • sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 8:46 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • I do not believe that he is elected by the people. I am not Catholic, so I really couldn't say.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 8:50 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • why should he? the deplorable policy of prioritizing the church's PR over the well being of children was institution wide, he was only being consistent.
    autodidact

    Answer by autodidact at 8:59 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • Was he the pope when the policy was enacted? Was he the pope when the molestation happened? If he is made to step down, it will just be to placate someone with a sacrifice; he would be the lamb (no pun intended). Let the church work through this. I'm not Catholic, but I think the Church will, in these times, will strive to do the right thing.

    jesse123456

    Answer by jesse123456 at 9:04 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • This was an institution-wide policy for decades, he was following "protocol", as awful as that was. Btw, most churches are now very careful about such things. The archdiocese of Denver has an extensive child safety program now. I had to attend an all day class, and go through a background check just to volunteer one day a week at the school. Most dioceses in the US at least are trying very hard to prevent such things from happening again, and they are doing all they can to let parents know this too. Just so you know...
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:26 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • I don't understand what Mr. Bisoli wants at this point. He is 61, isn't his abuser dead? Even if he is living, at this late date what good would it do to have a trial? A lot of people are dead or old, what evidence could there possibly be. Why was the trial stopped, perhaps the elderly priest was near death or maybe he admitted his sins...who knows.

    I hate what happened to him and I apologize on behalf of the church I love. I won't throw out the baby with the bath water through.

    I'm not excusing any of this, molestation of children is unacceptable and imo deserves the death penalty. My problem is with the parents--when they knew--not standing up for their children to begin with. There is no way I would let anyone talk me out of going to the police if it were my child ..priest or president I would have gone to the police.

    Why must there be a scapegoat today for the sins committed by others more than 50 years ago
    yourspecialkid

    Answer by yourspecialkid at 9:39 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • anon :26, our church is similar. I teach and I took a 2 day class and had to pass an FBI level background check. All classes have 2 teachers and our priests are never alone with children, not even in the moments before the mass when the altar servers/priest are getting ready for the service. One of our priest has been very outspoken where this whole issue is concerned.

    We just cannot punish those that had nothing to do with it or those that had no power over the protocols. Even though, I think I would have gone to the police if I had been in a position to know. There are many good people in the church though, should we stone all for the sins of some?
    yourspecialkid

    Answer by yourspecialkid at 9:46 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • My problem is with the parents--when they knew--not standing up for their children to begin with.
    ----
    When my dad was growing up, his older brother was approached by the parish priest while serving as an altar boy. Nothing happened, but he told my grandfather anyway. From that day forward, my grandfather went to Mass extra early to be sure he had a front row seat. He sat there and glared at the priest. He approached the priest one day and told him that if he ever found out that the priest touched any of the kids in the parish, he would cut his dick off. They don't think the priest bothered anyone and he transferred out of the parish the following year. My grandpa was aware that nothing would probably be done by the diocese, so he took matters into his own hands.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:50 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • Yes he should.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:54 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

  • My problem is with the parents--when they knew--not standing up for their children to begin with. There is no way I would let anyone talk me out of going to the police if it were my child ..priest or president I would have gone to the police.



    I agree with this 100%. There is no person in the WORLD that I would let get away with that. I can't even understand where these parents were coming from.

    DusterMommy

    Answer by DusterMommy at 10:15 PM on Mar. 26, 2010

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