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school dress code.

How many of you have a really strict dress code in your schools? My kids do! boys can not have thier hair touch thier collar in the back, cover thier earlobes or go over thier eyebrows. Here is what thier policy says:
Hair-length regulations that apply to boys but not to girls do not
manifest such an affront to students’ constitutional rights to merit
judicial intervention. Barber v. Colorado Indep. Sch. Dist., 901
S.W.2d 447 (Tex. 1995); Bastrop Indep. Sch. Dist. v. Toungate, 958
S.W.2d 365 (Tex. 1997)
Can someone tell me what that means? Does this mean we can not fight it?

Answer Question
 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 10:28 PM on Apr. 6, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Answers (25)
  • I believe it means that it may be a school rule, but, it isn't a real major one and if they break it, the school can't take you to court over it.



    My son's school doesn't care about hair, but, the clothes policy is freakin' strict.
    BradenIsMySon

    Answer by BradenIsMySon at 10:32 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

  • What kind of school is it? public? charter? private?
    BlooBird

    Answer by BlooBird at 10:32 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

  • My girls go to a private girls' school and are required to wear school uniform . We have no problems with that and hearing how other parents are spending ridiculous sums of money on designer jeans, sneakers and other clothing & accessories for their kids to wear to school and ' keep up ' with their peers, I am sure school uniforms and the other dress rules save us a lot of money !
    janet116

    Answer by janet116 at 10:37 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

  • The Controversy.

    Hair- Length Regulation in Bastrop. The community of Bastrop is located approximately 45 miles east of Austin, Texas. In contrast to Austin, Bastrop in 1991 remained a small, rural community. What the community lacked in size it made up for in community closeness and cohesion. The Bastrop ISD school board, headed by a highly successful general store owner, shared the sense of community.

    In 1991, the specter of changing times haunted the community. A four-lane highway lead from Austin to Bastrop, and the community was growing. There was talk of a new Austin airport on the highway between Bastrop and Austin. Drugs and gangs at school had become a concern. Confronting challenges to the community's agrarian values and traditions, the school board appointed a citizen committee to review and give recommendations on the district's student discipline policy.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:39 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

  • The Texas Supreme Court Rules on Hair-Length Regulations. The Barber decision from the Texas Supreme Court established that hair-length regulations at public schools would not violate the ERA. It did not answer whether or not hair-length regulations would violate the Code. In reversing the Court of Appeals in Toungate II, the Texas Supreme Court answered that question resoundingly and made clear that school districts in Texas were empowered to establish dress and grooming codes for students that included hair-length restrictions for male students.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:41 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

  • The ruling was appealed to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which remanded for a determination whether the long hair restriction violated the students' rights under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA). However, the case was settled without further decision and prior to the Court's decision that RFRA was unconstitutional. The Educator's Guide to Texas School Law, Kemerer and Walsh, 4th Ed., University of Texas Press, 1996; But see: City of Boerne v. Flores, 117 S.Ct. 2157 (1997).

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:42 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

  • we are in public schools. I have heard that people have been fighting this rule for over 20 years. why dont the tax payers geta say so? I am calling the superintendent tomorrow to see what I have to do to get this rule turned over. we are in a little poe dunk town about 2 hours from austin. I grew up in Utah were we didnt have these strick policies. It doesn't make sense to my why a 15 yr. old boy who is a 3.5 grade average, goes to church every sunday, voulenteers around the community, helps out at home cant have his hair longer. He has an emo hair cut and piercings. He is ok with removing his piercing for school, but would like to grow his sides and bangs out a little longer.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:46 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

  • Our PUBLIC SCHOOL kids have to wear uniforms! VERY regulated...as hair ect....


    Jewelry:   No body piercing other than a single stud earring in each ear.  Chains may be worn tucked inside shirts.


    No Fragrances  due to allergies and asthma of others.


    No Excessive Makeup.  No glitter.

    momof030404

    Answer by momof030404 at 10:49 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

  • Hair is to be clean and well groomed with no carvings or color.Clothing is to be neat and clean with no open holes, rips, or tears.Clothing, Bookbags may not display items related to or promoting violence, alcohol, tobacco, and/or drugs.  The same items must be free of vulgar pictures, and/or profanity, and/or offensive language.

    momof030404

    Answer by momof030404 at 10:51 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

  • I like dress codes. Having worked in schools with dress codes and schools without dress codes - dress codes much better. As a professional in the school I saw several things happen: theft not an issue. No purses allowed so no Coach purses stolen. Gang issues decreased on school grounds dramatically because there was no way to identify the different gangs and groups. Fights decreased. Although cameras hidden in the school helped a lot with that. But less fights due to most people were similar in appearance. Teasing about clothes and bullying decreased dramatically. All in all - most discipline problems went down by 65% the first year and kept falling each year after that. Hair was part of the code. Parents didn't have to send their child to that public school. They could have gone to other public schools open to them. And a lot did. Some came to the school for the purpose of the strict codes.

    frogdawg

    Answer by frogdawg at 10:54 PM on Apr. 6, 2010

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