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What is the Apocrypha?

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 5:48 PM on Apr. 22, 2010 in Religion & Beliefs

Answers (41)
  • The "inconvenient" books that were edited out of the bible later. Not that they're the only ones, there were dozens left out when it was first assembled hundreds of years after they were all written.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 5:52 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

  • They are seven books that are included in the Catholic Bible. They were removed from the Protestant Bible during the reformation.  Depending on the Bible you have they may or may not be included.  There are more Apocrypha books but most people are referring to the seven:  Tobit, Judith, Esther 10:4-16:24, Wisdom, Sirach,  Additions to Daniel, and Maccabees


    Here they are if your interested. Apocryha

    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 5:58 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

  • Books of the Bible that were not considered to be Divinely Inspired. The Catholic Bible (OT) includes some books that Protestants call Apocrypha, Catholics refer to them as the deuterocanonical texts. Protestants don't believe them to be divinely inspired but the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Churches do. (Just in case you are interested in what those are here's a link that lists them) They were removed from the Protestant Bibles during the Protestant reformation.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:00 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

  • Different Christian denominations have a different books that they include in the bible (aka different biblical canons). Those books which a denomination doesn't consider useful but not divinely inspired are referred as "apocrypha". The common example is the difference between Catholic and Protestant Bibles. Catholic bibles contain seven additional Old Testament Books plus additions to the Books of Daniel and Esther. Catholics refer to these as "deuterocanonical" and consider them part of the bibical canon. Protestants don't and so they refer o them as the "apocrypha". But that's not the only example. For example there are also Jewish apocrypha.

    eringobrough

    Answer by eringobrough at 6:45 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

  • The Catholics added the extra books. Later these books were removed. The extra books in the Old Testament are not in the Jew's Hebrew Book. Jesus and Paul did not quote from the extra books


     They weren't added they were removed. They were originally included in the KJV then removed , They are not extra books. We know they weren't in the original Jew's Hebrew Book, that's why they are called deuterocanonical, or second cannon. They are still sacred texts, no one has to read them but why keep them from people, many Protestant Bibles still include these texts at the end of their Bible in an appendix, so what is the big deal.

    RyansMom001

    Answer by RyansMom001 at 7:56 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

  • m2KnL, there are plenty of other things in the OT that were never quoted from in the NT. Also, we've had this discussion before and if you'd like to go there I can give you the same MASSIVE list of references from these texts that can be found in the NT...that is IF you'd like to see it AGAIN. Those book were NOT added, as Ryansmom said, they were REMOVED.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:04 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

  • Blah, blah, blah...OP don't listen to anti-Catholic rhetoric. If you're really interested more in just the deuterocanonical texts do some research of your own and try to find non-biased sources to do so.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:32 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

  • The Bible of the early Church always included, with varying degrees of recognition, the books now called deuterocanonical. For the most part their canonicity seems not to have been doubted in the Church until it was challenged by the Jews after A.D. 100. Regional councils in the West published official canons that included these books as early as the fourth and fifth centuries.

    Fragments of three deuterocanical books have been found among the Dead Sea scrolls found at Qumran. Sirach, whose Hebrew text was already known from the Cairo Geniza, has been found in two scrolls in Hebrew. Another Hebrew scroll of Sirach has been found in Masada. The Book of Tobit has been found in Qumran in four scrolls written in Aramaic and in one written in Hebrew. The Letter of Jeremiah (or Baruch chapter 6) has been found in cave 7 in Greek.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:38 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

  • The large majority of Old Testament references in the New Testament are taken from the Greek Septuagint—which includes the deuterocanonical books, as well as apocrypha—both of which are called collectively anagignoskomena (things that are read). Several appear to have been written originally in Hebrew, but the original text has long been lost. Archaeological finds, however, discovered some original texts among the Dead Sea scrolls. The Septuagint was widely accepted and used by Greek-speaking Jews in the first century, even in the region of Roman Judea, and therefore naturally became the text most widely used by early Christians, who were predominantly Greek speaking.


    In the New Testament, Hebrews 11:35 refers to an event that was only explicitly recorded in one of the deuterocanonical books (2 Maccabees 7)

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:39 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

  • 2010 by: m2KnL
    The Catholics added the extra books. Later these books were removed. The extra books in the Old Testament are not in the Jew's Hebrew Book. Jesus and Paul did not quote from the extra books



    I know enough not to listen to anything you say about "The Catholics" LOL sounds like a great football team like "The Giants" or "The Vikings"
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:44 PM on Apr. 22, 2010

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