Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Do birth control pills help to reduce menstrual bleeding?

FDA approves new birth control pill Natazia
Fri, May 7 2010
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday it approved Bayer AG's new birth control pill Natazia.

The pill, already licensed in Europe under the brand name Qlaira, is the first four-phase oral contraceptive marketed in the United States, the FDA said.
It delivers varying doses of the hormones progestin at four times throughout each 28-day treatment cycle.

"Nearly 12 million women in the United States and more than 100 million women worldwide currently use oral contraceptives," said the FDA's Dr. Scott Monroe.
"The approval of Natazia provides another option for women who choose to use an oral contraceptive as their method of contraception."

Two studies of 1,867 women found Natazia was effective, with many of the same side effects as other birth control pills, the FDA said.

continue..............................

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 5:59 PM on May. 8, 2010 in Health

This question is closed.
Answers (18)
  • So, then when you miss a pill or are late, it's twice as risky?
    Jademom07

    Answer by Jademom07 at 6:05 PM on May. 8, 2010

  • continue.....................................................

    In October, Bayer reported the drug could also reduce excessive menstrual bleeding.

    end
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 5:59 PM on May. 8, 2010

  • "So what then makes this particular pill different from the others already on the market?  Well, Natazia becomes the first oral contraceptive that will be marketed in the US that is a four phase contraceptive. What this means is that during a woman’s 28 day cycle, this pill will deliver different levels of hormones four times a month to its user.  It is also different from the other contraceptives in that it is the first one to contain an estrogen called estradiol valerate combined with a progestin called dienogest.  This was unheard of in the oral contraceptive market in its combination pills, which usually contained only ethinyl estradiol. "

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:03 PM on May. 8, 2010

  • "Natazia needs to be taken once a day. It delivers varying doses of hormones at four times throughout each 28-day treatment cycle. Specifically, the dosing regimen consists of pills with varying doses of estradiol valerate, and estradiol valerate in combination with dienogest, for specific days of the 28-day cycle. Each blister pack of Natazia contains the following pills that must be taken in this specific order: 2 dark yellow tablets each containing 3 mg estradiol valerate, 5 medium red tablets each containing 2 mg estradiol valerate and 2 mg dienogest, 17 light yellow tablets each containing 2 mg estradiol valerate and 3 mg dienogest, 2 dark red tablets each containing 1 mg estradiol valerate, and 2 white tablets (inert/placebo) tablets."

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:07 PM on May. 8, 2010

  • Sorry, but every pill I have tried has landed me in the ER! I won't be trying anything new...
    SabrinaMBowen

    Answer by SabrinaMBowen at 6:08 PM on May. 8, 2010

  • Same here.. I was just on 3 different types of BC and every single one of them gave me reverse periods. I bled for about 26 days and had a 4 day break.. then it would repeat. NEVER AGAIN
    Ctink8189

    Answer by Ctink8189 at 6:11 PM on May. 8, 2010

  • With the name Qlaira is how Natazia was marketed in Europe


    gebruik van qlaira

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:13 PM on May. 8, 2010

  • A German study examining the effect of high doses of dienogest on endometriosis found the women taking it had a significant reduction in breast size. This doesn’t necessarily mean that Qlaira will reduce breast size

    http://www.virginiahopkinstestkits.com/qlairabirthcontrol.html
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:16 PM on May. 8, 2010

  • "Bayer is so far focusing its marketing on the estradiol component of Qlaira®, which is unique. It is the first oral contraceptive to use an essentially natural estrogen. However, pretending that this makes it a “natural” contraceptive by ignoring the dienogest is misleading. It’s likely that if this product isn’t already in the U.S. FDA pipeline awaiting approval (possibly under a different name), it will be, and the marketing will undoubtedly follow the same twisted path. Buyer be aware."

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:17 PM on May. 8, 2010

  • Can you take the pill indefinitely?

    Some research suggests that prolonged use of birth control pills increases the risk of certain types of cancer, such as cervical cancer and liver cancer. However, use of birth control pills also decreases the risk of other types of cancer, such as ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer. The effect of birth control pills on breast cancer risk isn't clear. Some research indicates that birth control pills slightly increase the risk of breast cancer — but that 10 or more years after stopping the pill, a woman's breast cancer risk returns to the same level as if she had never taken birth control pills. Other studies don't support a link between birth control pills and breast cancer.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 6:24 PM on May. 8, 2010