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What methods of disiclipining are good and really work.I am a single mom and i've everything from spanking to talking to taking away activities. Whats next?

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bae-bae

Asked by bae-bae at 3:41 PM on May. 21, 2010 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

Level 1 (0 Credits)
Answers (11)
  • Taking things away works, but you need to be consistent and do it EVERY time and expect it's going to take several tries before the lesson sinks in.
    gdiamante

    Answer by gdiamante at 3:43 PM on May. 21, 2010

  • Time out. Get a small chair, put it in the corner facing the wall, and when the child does not follow rules or doesn't listen give them a time out. The time out should be one minute for every year old they are (age 5= 5 minute time out). Good luck! Make sure the child sits in the corner the full length of time. If they get up simply put them back in the corner, do not get mad or yell. Simply pick them up and put them back on the chair without saying anything. Time outs usually work because children do not like to be ignored, sitting in the corner alone also gives them time to consider why they are there.
    imamommmmyyy

    Answer by imamommmmyyy at 3:44 PM on May. 21, 2010

  • Read "raising our children, raising ourselves" by naomi aldort.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:45 PM on May. 21, 2010

  • Have you tried. What you say you do method? If you say go clean your room, Or you will not eat dinner. They do not go clean their room. Then they do not eat dinner. If you follow through with your threats they will start listening to you.
    louise2

    Answer by louise2 at 3:53 PM on May. 21, 2010

  • Why the hell would you threaten to take away dinner!?!? That is just wrong, I can see saying no dessert but no dinner? That is awful! Dinner shouldn't be an earned right. Any child who must earn their dinner is in a bad situation.
    imamommmmyyy

    Answer by imamommmmyyy at 4:14 PM on May. 21, 2010

  • Each child is different i what works for them. My youngest knows that she will be punished if i reach the number 3 while counting. She usually stops the activity that is wrong. But i must follow thru. If we are out I will either leave the place we are at, make her sit in a stroller (she hates) or take her to a bathroom or the car and she is to stand with her nose to the wall. and that is horrible for her cuz it "makes her legs hurt" (from a 3 year old).
    roxyann76

    Answer by roxyann76 at 5:38 PM on May. 21, 2010

  • imamommmmyyy. What I was saying was an example of what to do. Not what to do. If you do not like that use other thingsLike movies,toys desert ect.
    louise2

    Answer by louise2 at 7:14 PM on May. 21, 2010

  • Whatever you decide to do, make sure you're consistent. NO type of discipline will work if you aren't consistent and do it the same every time.
    Laura2U

    Answer by Laura2U at 8:39 PM on May. 21, 2010

  • Taking children seriously.

    Discipline is supposed to mean 'teaching' not 'punishing'... Read Alfie Kohn's 'Unconditional Parenting' for a long and involved description of why trying to control kids does not work --at least unless some of your idea of 'working' includes raising arsonists, suicidal teens, or violent criminals.

    A child who apparently 'needs' a lot of punishment is in an environment that is antagonistic to healthy childhood. Children do not need things they can't touch or explore around them. They don't need to learn that they're the least important people on the planet or that their preferences or desires are irrelevant or an impediment to other people's lives. The don't need to live 'modern' schedules that interfere with sleep, regular meals and snacks or have long periods of quiet sedentary activities.

    Punishment teaches children they're wrong and bad, and makes them angry and devious.

    Love doesn't.
    LindaClement

    Answer by LindaClement at 2:37 AM on May. 22, 2010

  • Rule number one, be consistent; stop jumping from method to method. Don't expect perfection.


    Raising Our Children, Raising Ourselves by Naomi Aldort is a fantastic book. You can learn more here: http://www.naomialdort.com/

    rkoloms

    Answer by rkoloms at 9:46 AM on May. 22, 2010

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