Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

What responsibilities come along with being power of attorney over someone in nursing home(my mother)?

My mom is in a nursing home and my brother is her current power of attorney. He is moving to California(we live in Kentucky) and I am going to be taking over for her. I was just wondering what it would require me to do. Not that I mind or anything, I am just wondering what to expect.

 
BlainesMommy09

Asked by BlainesMommy09 at 4:53 PM on Jun. 29, 2010 in Relationships

Level 20 (9,173 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (5)
  • I have a power of attorney for my parents. I learned that there are many different kinds: financial, medical, etc....It depends on what your mom can and can not do/ decide for herself. My dad has dementia, he still does things like picking out his clothes, but he forgets that he just ate, so he goes to eat again. I live with them, so it's a different issue for me.
    I imagine you would be called to talk about bills to be paid, different treatments or medicines needed, if she has to go for medical tests, you would give consent (or say no).
    THere is a cafemom group called the sandwich generation...we are not very active, because we are caring for our "bread", but look it up if you'd like.
    Good luck!
    kjrn79

    Answer by kjrn79 at 4:57 PM on Jun. 29, 2010

  • You have control over everything. Her finances, her doctors, living arrangements. You are in charge of everything. I will tell you that it is a lot of responsibility. My mom was in a nursing home, and is back in the hospital now. Every time something happened, we would get a phone call from the home and they had to tell us what happened. If she fell out of the bed, if her oxygen levels went down, and of course if she went to the hospital. You will also be responsible for her bills. You will have to pay them from her social security, if she gets it, and medicaid as well. BTW- we live in Kentucky too. Be careful with these nursing homes, some of them really are horrible. Good luck with your mom, though.

    krissyvelazquez

    Answer by krissyvelazquez at 9:03 PM on Jun. 29, 2010

  • I'm pretty much sure that you just make her decisions on behalf of her because she can't decide on her own.
    CAGirl4

    Answer by CAGirl4 at 4:54 PM on Jun. 29, 2010

  • POAs can be limited or all encompassing. It just depends on how it was written up. Some things to consider:
    -is there a medical directive?
    -DNR?
    -will you be handling finances or just medical issues?

    When you're responsible for someone who is in a nursing home, some things you may need to be involved in are:
    -payment
    -monitoring care
    -arranging dr. appts
    -authorizing treatment (important to know the wishes of the person or what's in the directive)

    BuddyRoo

    Answer by BuddyRoo at 4:59 PM on Jun. 29, 2010

  • There are 2 POAs. Medical and financial. Medical makes decisions about her healthcare when she can't. Financial allows you to access her accounts and sign things on her behalf. Pay bills, etc. Remeber that POA ends at death so make sure she has her affairs in order such as beneficiaries listed and such.
    bjane01

    Answer by bjane01 at 7:18 PM on Jun. 29, 2010