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I believe my daughter suffers from night terrors, any one have some advice?

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amjones707

Asked by amjones707 at 5:20 PM on Oct. 1, 2008 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

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Answers (8)
  • How old is she? Is there a pattern to them, for example, only occurring when she's overtired? Do they occur at the same time each nite? My son went through this; they stopped when he was about 4-5. They only happened when he was extremely overtired and you could set your watch to when they would take place . . . exactly one hour after he fell asleep. He would have absolutely no recollection the next day. All we could do when they took place was to comfort him and make sure he didn't hurt himself (like you would do for a sleepwalker); he'd usually fall back asleep within a few minutes. There are differing theories on why they happen in the first place; for us, there was a definite pattern between his vaccinations and his night terrors. I don't really have any advise for you but I wish you the best.
    FootballMom85

    Answer by FootballMom85 at 9:52 PM on Oct. 1, 2008

  • Don't worry-they are not as bad as they seem. I experienced them with my son when he was around 5-he would wake up about an hour or so after falling asleep, screaming and crying hysterically and sometimes thrashing all over the bed. You could not talk to or reason with him while this was happening-it's as if they're not really there because they are still "sleeping". We would usually just make sure he couldn't hurt himself physically and hold him only if he let us-otherwise it would just exacerbate the situation. Eventually it would stop and you could calm him back to bed, and the next day, he would have no memory of the event at all. He grew out of it after about a 7 or 8 months and it's never happened again (he's now 8:)
    jennifer3394

    Answer by jennifer3394 at 2:02 AM on Oct. 2, 2008

  • My son started to get them soon after he was born and has had them pretty regularly over the past 5 years. For my son I would just hold and rock him until he calmed, either by waking up or going back into a restful sleep. He has no real pattern to when he gets them, so we haven't really been able to find the cause. The best we can do is sooth them and make sure he doesn't hurt himself or his siblings (who try to comfort him also) when he does have one...
    Mi_Chelly

    Answer by Mi_Chelly at 3:03 AM on Oct. 2, 2008

  • I wonder if it is inheritiated. I had them and still have bad dreams. my eight yr old has them too. I pray with her and read scripture. she sleeps with her bible under the pillow and I think its making her stronger in a way.
    JCRestoredme

    Answer by JCRestoredme at 7:16 PM on Oct. 2, 2008

  • I wonder if it is inheritiated. I had them and still have bad dreams. my eight yr old has them too. I pray with her and read scripture. she sleeps with her bible under the pillow and I think its making her stronger in a way.
    JCRestoredme

    Answer by JCRestoredme at 7:16 PM on Oct. 2, 2008

  • My oldest son had them ...started around 4 or 5 and stopped after about 1-2 years. They usually start at the same time after about 1 hour into sleep, they usually were overtired or overstimulated that day. It is very frightening because they sometimes open their eyes, and my son would cry help me help me or no no I wanted to wake him out of it, but was told not to do that by the doctor. It does make it worse if you try to wake them. make sure they dont hurt themselves and it usually stops after about 1 or 2 min. and then they are fast asleep like nothing and you are left with heart palpatations staring at the ceiling for one hour!!! Good Luck.
    shellyj40

    Answer by shellyj40 at 8:49 PM on Oct. 3, 2008

  • Night terrors is common for somebody who is between the ages of five and eight. What you might want to do is put a nightlight in a child's room as well as giving him or her something to sleep with , such as a teddy bear. It might provide them some comfort in the middle of the night. You may want to even consider visiting this incredible website called Nogginpower2. I checked out this website myself, and I quickly found out how helpful it really was. In your case, one manual I strongly suggest you look up on Nogginpower2 is getting a Good Night Sleep. It would give you some strategies and tips on how to help your child avoid night terrors. I hope this helps. Thank you and good luck.
    paulacolls19715

    Answer by paulacolls19715 at 11:15 AM on Oct. 6, 2008

  • I was told my daughter had night terrors (up until a couple of years back). I'd never seen anything like it. But that's what they told me. I never heard of it before, so I just excepted it. After a couple of years of it she began to have more frequent stomach and headaches, so she went on a strict diet to rule out allergies. We found that she had some sort of intolerance to caffeine (not an allergy), but the "night terrors" also stopped. A few weeks later a lunch lady thought it wouldn't hurt to give her one little hershey kiss. She complained of stomachache and headache and for a few nights there after she screamed and thrashed in her sleep. Years later-she had this episode, a few weeks ago. I asked her if she ate chocolate. She admitted it. It's been a few years since the Hershey kiss incident so she hasn't grown out of it. It may be worth a try.
    LADYLadylady

    Answer by LADYLadylady at 6:50 AM on Oct. 23, 2008

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