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I would like to know what the rationale is, behind blaming something that you do not believe in?

"I also think that there may be major underlying issues for people who have no faith. Do they blame a God for what they have been dealt in life? So they turn their back as result?"

What is the rationale behind blaming something that you do not factually believe even exists? How, do tell, is it possible to blame failures or bad experiences on something which does not factually exist?

 
ObbyDobbie

Asked by ObbyDobbie at 12:54 PM on Jul. 29, 2010 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 34 (70,074 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (29)
  • It's a surprisingly common assumption that is way off base. It makes as much sense as thinking I blame Santa if something bad happens, and that's why I don't believe in him.
    JulieJacobKyle

    Answer by JulieJacobKyle at 12:56 PM on Jul. 29, 2010

  • A number of misconceptions with that statement which I would gather was made by a believer.
    1) Just becasue we do not have faith in their God does not mean we have no faith. Please look up the definition of faith.
    2) If we don't beleive in your deity of course we don't blame said deity for bad things happening. That's a nice little excuse believers come up with as a way to try to wrap their heads around our non-belief in their deity. So they choose to be ignorant and claim we're really just "mad at God" instead and we lack belief out of rebellion but secretly really do believe. Especially when the "why does God let bad things happen" arguement occurs
    3) The "Why does God let bad things happen" argument only occurs when one tries to challenge our beliefs and convert us by telling us their god is all loving etc. It's really just a twist of the Epicurian riddle.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 1:02 PM on Jul. 29, 2010

  • I've always found it amazing how many people assume that Atheists hate or are angry with God... Which makes positively no sence... That's like saying "I'm angry with Santa cause I didn't get a pony, so he must not exist" REALLY? What kind of thinking is that?
    SabrinaMBowen

    Answer by SabrinaMBowen at 1:27 PM on Jul. 29, 2010

  • I understand what you're saying and I agree, yet I can see instances where someone may, for example, pray often and never get any response in their eyes, then decide that God must not exist.
    LovingSAHMommy

    Answer by LovingSAHMommy at 12:56 PM on Jul. 29, 2010

  • Don't know why they think this though. No one ever has an answer to that.



    In my experience it is often an issue of "projection" where the person themselves had been mad at their god for one thing or another and "left" their faith only to make bad decisions and try to absolve tehmselves of all responsibility and then returned to their faith later on. I've literally seen these people say "I was an atheist, I was mad at God" to which I would have to scratch my head and try to explain that the two were NOT the same thing and you couldn't have been mad at something you didn't believe to exist.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 1:17 PM on Jul. 29, 2010

  • "I also think that there may be major underlying issues for people who have no faith. Do they blame a God for what they have been dealt in life? So they turn their back as result?"
    LOL this does make me laugh.  I've been an atheist all my life.  I've been happy and lived comfortably.  I have my physical and mental health. My relationships with my parents, husband, children, extended family, in-laws and friends are all successful.  How can I blame a god when I have no blame to lay?

    beeky

    Answer by beeky at 2:12 PM on Jul. 29, 2010

  • I've met a couple of people who said something like "god didn't answer my prayers, he let my so-and-so die, he didn't give me the winning lotto numbers when I asked so I don't believe in him anymore". But they are rare.
    I don't get either why people just assume it's like that with everyone.
    The same thing like Julie said, if santa didn't bring me that dollhouse I asked for, then should I stop believing in him?
    I think the people who say that we don't believe because something bad happened are just using that because they can't get their head around it that we choose to believe the way we do, that we weren't forced into it.
    Don't know why they think this though. No one ever has an answer to that.
    Kiwismommy19

    Answer by Kiwismommy19 at 1:02 PM on Jul. 29, 2010

  • So really the whole question posed here was flawed from it's onset but I have a feeling the OP knew that and was merely trying to bring that flaw to light as I'm sure the quoted section was not her own words.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 1:03 PM on Jul. 29, 2010

  • Ah, Kristi- That is the point that so many miss, and where most of the misconceptions come from.



    Don't I know it. And heaven forbid if we get in it with someone of a differing faith over their bad actions and get upset with the individual. Then we somehow are "mad at their God" and not peeved at the individual themselves. But that's moving onto a "God complex" which is slightly different from the projection issue (though they could be related in some cases). I'm sure anyone that is a regular here has seen this one in action.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 1:34 PM on Jul. 29, 2010

  • FYI...I was joking. I thought was apparent. Guess not.
    LovingSAHMommy

    Answer by LovingSAHMommy at 1:53 PM on Jul. 29, 2010