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New testement vs. Old testement

How do you reconcile the vast differences in both?

The brutality and laws from the old testement vs. the way more lenient New testement??

Why are they so different?

 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 9:31 AM on Aug. 9, 2010 in Religious Debate

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (53)
  • I believe in God, just not the Bible as it is presented

    Me to I believe in the untranslated version which is quite different. It is more to the original text than the translated which while translating I'm sure they added their own control spin. The untranslated version never even mentioned hell. It mentioned hades which is quite different. That is why I believe god is the pagan god of truth. It also mention other gods being real. I also believe the holy spirit to be the heavenly mother and the goddess of wisdom and guidance. Which is also implicated in the untranslated version.
    hot-mama86

    Answer by hot-mama86 at 12:11 PM on Aug. 9, 2010

  • At the very heart of this question lies a fundamental misunderstanding of what both the Old and New Testaments reveal about the nature of God. Another way of expressing this same basic thought is when people say, “The God of the Old Testament is a God of wrath while the God of the New Testament is a God of love.” The fact that the Bible is God’s progressive revelation of Himself to us through historical events and through His relationship with people throughout history might contribute to misconceptions about what God is like in the Old Testament as compared to the New Testament. However, when one reads both the Old and the New Testaments, it becomes evident that God is not different from one testament to another and that God’s wrath and His love are revealed in both testaments.
    missionarywifey

    Answer by missionarywifey at 10:11 AM on Aug. 9, 2010

  • or example, throughout the Old Testament, God is declared to be a “compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness,” (Exodus 34:6; Numbers 14:18; Deuteronomy 4:31; Nehemiah 9:17; Psalm 86:5, 15; 108:4; 145:8; Joel 2:13). Yet in the New Testament, God’s loving-kindness and mercy are manifested even more fully through the fact that “for God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life” (John 3:16). Throughout the Old Testament, we also see God dealing with Israel the same way a loving father deals with a child. When they willfully sinned against Him and began to worship idols, God would punish them. Yet, each time He would deliver them once they had repented of their idolatry. This is much the same way God deals with Christians in the New Testament.
    missionarywifey

    Answer by missionarywifey at 10:13 AM on Aug. 9, 2010

  • the point is: God doesn't change who He is from the Old Testament to the New. He judged sin in the OT just as He did in the NT, and He is still a merciful, loving God today.
    missionarywifey

    Answer by missionarywifey at 10:21 AM on Aug. 9, 2010

  • There are those who see God as He is, all knowing, all powerful, and good. There are those who don't see Him that way because they are trying to apply our standards to His when it should be the other way around. If it were a person committing those acts, sure they would have been evil because we don't have the right to give and take life at will, we don't have the ability to see inside someone's heart, mind and soul. But we are speaking of the Creator, the Almighty, the one who you cannot hide from. Those things that happened in the OT were a part of the history of a loving God pursuing his children so that more could be found than were lost. You can take only a few lines from any book and think something completely different about the meaning. You have to read it and have a desire to understand. There are no contradictions, just misinterpretations.
    NikkiMomof2grls

    Answer by NikkiMomof2grls at 10:15 AM on Aug. 9, 2010

  • " If it were a person committing those acts, sure they would have been evil because we don't have the right to give and take life at will, we don't have the ability to see inside someone's heart, mind and soul. But we are speaking of the Creator, the Almighty, the one who you cannot hide from."

    And not only this...but we are not God, He is. So of course we don't have those qualities. God is the only righteous judge.
    NikkiMomof2grls

    Answer by NikkiMomof2grls at 10:17 AM on Aug. 9, 2010

  • the OT is more historical/data/etc, along with the occurances of sacrifices of the people for their sins..once JC came, altar sacrifices were no longer necessary ('the veil' was torn..meaning everyone had access to the Father/Holy of Holies, rather than just the high priests.) and the NT is more of the accounts/words/teachings of JC and his disciples, the beginning of xtianity, if you will. different needs, different set of books.
    dullscissors

    Answer by dullscissors at 9:33 AM on Aug. 9, 2010

  • The Old Testament points forward to the need of a Savior and the coming of Jesus Christ to fulfill that role. The New Testament was written after the incarnate Christ came on the scene. There are no inconsistencies--just a different viewpoint.
    NannyB.

    Answer by NannyB. at 9:41 AM on Aug. 9, 2010

  • Agreeing with dullscissors. The OT is the history of humankind's choice in going his own way rather than God's way, beginning in the garden of Eden. And how our own way leads to laws that we can't fulfill and reveals how we needed a savior...and that savior was promised in the OT. NT is about the fulfillment of the OT through Jesus Christ, it is about salvation and how he presensted the sacrifice (himself) to end all sacrfice and to bridge the gap between God and man that occured through sin back in the garden of Eden. The veil was torn when Jesus said "It is finished" and died on the cross. He conquered the grave and gives us that opportunity as well.
    NikkiMomof2grls

    Answer by NikkiMomof2grls at 9:45 AM on Aug. 9, 2010

  • The brutality and sacrifice were no longer necessary after Christ paying for sin with his life.
    salexander

    Answer by salexander at 9:46 AM on Aug. 9, 2010