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3 Bumps

During the Health Care debate, Democrats promised...

government intervention in the health care market would not mean that treatment decisions would come down to cost issues...
HOWEVER, what would you call this?

Federal regulators are considering taking the highly unusual step of rescinding approval of a drug that patients with advanced breast cancer turn to as a last-ditch hope.
The debate over Avastin, prescribed to about 17,500 women with breast cancer a year, has become entangled in the politically explosive struggle over medical spending and effectiveness that flared during the battle over health-care reform: How should the government balance protecting patients and controlling costs without restricting access to cutting-edge, and often costly, treatments? …
The FDA is not supposed to consider costs in its decisions, but if the agency rescinds approval, insurers are likely to stop paying for treatment.
“It’s hard to talk about Avastin without talking about costs,”

Answer Question
 
grlygrlz2

Asked by grlygrlz2 at 2:04 PM on Aug. 16, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 39 (106,530 Credits)
Answers (35)
  • The FDA is reviewing the recommendation of influential scientific advisers to revoke authorization of the drug to treat metastatic breast cancer. Contrary to initial research, new studies indicate that the benefits of the drug, which costs $8,000 a month, do not outweigh its risks, the advisory panel concluded.

    grlygrlz2

    Comment by grlygrlz2 (original poster) at 2:06 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

  • LOL You are kidding right? Guess that will be the first of many drugs embroiled in explosive controversy. I'm so glad these things are coming out. 2 yrs from now people will be begging to go back to NOT having insurance.
    itsmesteph11

    Answer by itsmesteph11 at 2:06 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

  • "It's our opinion that when we look at the data, they are clinically meaningful," said Sandra Horning, who heads cancer research for San-Francisco-based Genentech. "Avastin should continue to be an option for women."
    grlygrlz2

    Comment by grlygrlz2 (original poster) at 2:08 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

  • "I am very concerned about people who are receiving the drug and may feel threatened that they may not be able to receive it," said the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute's Winer, who is also chief scientific officer for Susan G. Komen for the Cure, a breast cancer patient advocacy group. "This is not a worthless drug by any means. There is almost certainly a group of women who get a big benefit. "

    grlygrlz2

    Comment by grlygrlz2 (original poster) at 2:08 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

  • OK....the FDA says it is risky to take the drug and it costs $8000. a month to take it. Would YOU take a chance on a drug that could kill you faster than the breast cancer??? At $8000. a pop? No way.
    gertie41

    Answer by gertie41 at 2:09 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

  • I'm very upset," said Leslie Twohig, 48, of Lothian, Md., who has been taking Avastin for eight months and credits the drug with helping her survive. "How long will I be able to stay on Avastin? Are they going to take it away? I know it's working for me. Right now I am able to enjoy my life. Every morning I wake up and wonder how long it's going to go on."
    grlygrlz2

    Comment by grlygrlz2 (original poster) at 2:10 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

  • Would YOU take a chance on a drug that could kill you faster than the breast cancer???

    ***

    The drug is a LAST DITCH effort....I would try anything at that point...what would I have to lose?! Heck, I would sign up for drug trials and be a guinea pig at that point....if I could help someone else after exhausting all of my other options.
    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 2:11 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

  • The point is, gertie, that the Dems promised cost wouldn't be a factor in the new insurance. So it doesn't matter if it's not worth the cost. Because cost wasn't supposed to be considered. If I were paying out of pocket, no, I wouldn't risk it. But this is the whole point behind "free" healthcare for everyone. If you aren't paying for it, you won't care how much it costs!! So if you don't have to pay for the $8000/pill medication you aren't going to care that it costs that much. And since we were promised cost wouldn't determine quality of care, the "free" healthcare should pay for it. Or we shouldn't get "free" healthcare, people should pay for it. Then they'd value you it and make better decisions.
    Laura2U

    Answer by Laura2U at 2:12 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

  • gertie, get your head out of your a$$ and research that this drug has provided a 110% improvement in the quality of life for MANY women. If prescribed correctly to the right patients, there are HUGE benefits. Not every drug works on EVERY person. So does that mean that it's approval should be rescinded by the FDA? Perhaps with proper diagnosis ~the best qualified candidates can have an opportunity to use this drug... And with further advancement and research better drugs can follow.... It seems like the FDA is wanting a cheap One size fits all Drug Only solution to breast cancer (in this case)... That just isn't reality.

    grlygrlz2

    Comment by grlygrlz2 (original poster) at 2:14 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

  • Federal regulators are considering taking the highly unusual step of rescinding approval of a drug that patients with advanced breast cancer turn to as a last-ditch hope.


    Insurance companies were ALREADY dumping cancer patients ...specifically BREAST CANCER patients at an alarming rate..they testified before congress they wouldn't stop

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 2:17 PM on Aug. 16, 2010

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