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Uplifting Experience?

Do you have an uplifting story or experience that you would like to share with others? We see so much negativity/bashing/etc online that I thought it would be good to have a postive post.

 
hsmominky

Asked by hsmominky at 1:55 AM on Sep. 18, 2010 in Just for Fun

Level 23 (16,376 Credits)
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Answers (23)
  • My daughter was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. Because she has no insurance getting her treatment has been very minimal. Until today. A rheumatologist in the next town over called today and is willing to take her on as a patient with little or no expense on our part. She was diagnosed last January. She is 22 and has to use a walker. So this is really fantastic news. Not many Doctors a willing to do that
    dragonlady44

    Answer by dragonlady44 at 2:04 AM on Sep. 18, 2010

  • Here is mine..................I will have to break it in parts because it is my Daughters Heart Story....


    If you have ever sat down and read stories about Congenital Heart Defects then you have heard most parents say that their child was diagnosed in utero or child birth. Sometimes that is not the case. Sometimes CHD'S are actually silent killers. They have little to no symptoms on the outward appearance but on the inside they are killing our children. For my daughter,Maddie, that was just the case.
    Maddie was born on a cold February day in 2000. It was bitter cold and snowing outside but inside that hospital room where I was becoming a first time mom it was full of warmth and love. My pregnancy had been pretty easy and all of the tests I had including ultrasounds showed that I was having a healthy baby. Miss Maddie was stubborn so I was induced. Her delivery was after 23 hours of labor and Mom was worn out,
    hsmominky

    Comment by hsmominky (original poster) at 1:57 AM on Sep. 18, 2010

  • but I forgot how tired I was when the doctors handed me that beautiful baby girl. She had a head full of black hair and the longest fingers. She was the most beautiful thing I had ever laid eyes on. I was only 19 but I did my best to be the best Mother to her I could be. I took her to every doctors appointment and took her a lot of times when she just had the sniffles to be safe. At one particular appt when she was about 6 months old the doctor mentioned that she heard a heart mumur but told me that it was from a PFO and would close as Maddie got older. I said okay and we resumed our life. Maddie got older and she was doing well to the naked eye but as her Mom I had several concerns. It seemed that Maddie got out of breath very easy. She was most comfortable sitting and watching TV as opposed to bouncing around and being a ball of energy like most toddlers. She ate well but she NEVER gained an ounce.
    hsmominky

    Comment by hsmominky (original poster) at 1:57 AM on Sep. 18, 2010

  • As time went on I became more and more concerned about her lack of weight gain and her getting short of breath. I took her to the doctor when she was three and voiced my concerns. They listened to her and said that they heard something very faint. They told me that this was the orginal murmer she had from the PFO at birth. They explained that they give PFO's at least five years to close before they become concerned. They didn't even seem to be very concerned about her lack of energy or non weight gain.
    hsmominky

    Comment by hsmominky (original poster) at 1:58 AM on Sep. 18, 2010

  • left the office that day feeling very uneasy. I decided to make it my mission to find out if there was something wrong with my baby. I went home and got out a journal. I began to note things that I thought weren't right. How much she played vs how much she would sit. The fact that she would tire out so easily and what she was doing. The discoloration of her lips. What she ate and what she weighed. After a few weeks I returned to the doctors office. I gave him all of my notes and asked him to hear me out. He listened but he wasn't really hearing me....he was hearing a mom who he felt was overreacting. I was Maddie's Mother...I was listening to my Mother's Instinct which was given to me by God and it was telling me that something was wrong. As he listened he decided to give Maddie a good physical. Once again he told me that he didn't hear anything but the faint noise which to him meant that the PFO was closing.
    hsmominky

    Comment by hsmominky (original poster) at 1:58 AM on Sep. 18, 2010

  • NOT GOOD ENOUGH!!! Yes, those were my words to him. I'm so sorry but that is NOT GOOD ENOUGH! This is my child. I want definitive answers. He told me that I could take her to UK Children's Hospital but it would be on my own and I needed to call and make the appt. I left his office that day and very promptly called UK to set her up an appt with a cardiologist. The days spent between that doctor visit and her appt at UK seemed to linger on. Then the day came in 2003 when I took her. I'll never forget that day as long as I live. We went in and they started her ECHO and the technician got a funny look on her face. She asked Maddie to lay still. Then she tried to be professional and tell me she needed to get something. The something was another tech and I knew something was wrong.
    hsmominky

    Comment by hsmominky (original poster) at 1:59 AM on Sep. 18, 2010

  • I was terrified. The second tech looked at the ECHO and they asked me to sit down. They expained to me that Maddie had a hole in her heart, an ASD they called it. It was not just the PFO that the doctors had originally told me, however, a PFO existed as well. I wanted to faint. They explained to me that they still thought it might close on it's own and they wanted to monitor her for a year! HA! Are you kidding me? I had gone from being told that she had a small PFO which should close on its own to being told that she had an ASD/PFO. I hugged her tighter than I ever had before and carried her to the car. I called Timmy and sobbed on the phone. Then I went home and made it my mission to educate myself about ASD's and Congenital heart defects in general.
    hsmominky

    Comment by hsmominky (original poster) at 2:00 AM on Sep. 18, 2010

  • This was like a roller coaster ride to me because I had never even heard the words Congenital Heart Defect much less had any kind of education on them. The more I read about an ASD the scarier it got.
    Here is some of the information I read
    What is an Atrial Septal Defect? The heart is divided into four separate chambers. The upper chambers, or atria, are divided by a wall called the septum. An atrial septal defect (ASD) is a hole in that septum. Atrial septal defects are one of the most common heart defects seen.
    When an atrial septal defect is present, blood flows through the hole primarily from the left atrium to the right atrium. This shunting increases the blood volume in the right atrium which means more blood flows through the lungs than would normally.
    hsmominky

    Comment by hsmominky (original poster) at 2:00 AM on Sep. 18, 2010

  • If left untreated, atrial septal defect may cause problems in adulthood. These problems may include pulmonary hypertension (which is high blood pressure in the lungs), congestive heart failure (weakening of the heart muscle), atrial arrhythmias (which are abnormal rhythms or beating of the heart) and an increased risk of stroke.
    Atrial septal defect signs and symptoms In most children, atrial septal defects cause no symptoms. A very large defect may allow so much blood flow through it to cause congestive heart failure symptoms such as shortness of breath, easy fatigability, or poor growth. Most often an atrial septal defect is diagnosed when a physician hears a heart murmur during a physical examination.
    hsmominky

    Comment by hsmominky (original poster) at 2:00 AM on Sep. 18, 2010

  • The murmur doesn't actually come from blood going across the hole, but rather from the pulmonary valve area because the heart is forcing an unusually large amount of blood through a normal sized valve.
    The second heart sound is characteristically "split" which is different than what is heard when listening to a normal heart. Diagnosis of atrial septal defects Hearing a murmur on a physical exam is the most common reason an atrial septal defect is suspected. Echocardiography is the primary method used to confirm the presence of an atrial septal defect. Echocardiography can show not only the hole and its size, but also any enlargement of the right atrium and ventricle in response to the extra work they are doing.
    hsmominky

    Comment by hsmominky (original poster) at 2:01 AM on Sep. 18, 2010