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How many numbers and letters can your 5 year old write? And their name?

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 7:47 AM on Jul. 2, 2008 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

Answers (7)
  • All.. and yep she can write her name. I say ALL numbers because she can write each number 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0.

    She can put numbers together and write and recognized all the way up to 50...it won't be long until she will be able to write ANY number.

    Yes, DD is 6 now, but she just turn 6 in April (so she's only been 6 for 3 months) and she could write her name since she was 4 and the numbers like she does now since last January.

    SAHMinIL

    Answer by SAHMinIL at 8:34 AM on Jul. 2, 2008

  • my 5 year old girl can write letters i havent started numbers with her but when she is watching tv like sesame street she will run and get paper to write the letters she sees and she writes her first name sometimes she might mix letters i just been trying to get her to write on the line. she writes and knows mom. sometimes she will write other small words she sees but she dont read or know the letters by reconition. she likes to trace the words and things that are on the pizza menu.
    jaes347

    Answer by jaes347 at 2:51 PM on Jul. 2, 2008

  • My 5yo (who is starting kindergarten in the fall) can write her first name in capital letters (she knows the lower case ones but refuses to use them). I don't know if she remembers how to spell her last name since they only had to write their first names on their papers in preschool.
    She can write all of the letters if she has something to look at (copy). Other wise she remembers the letters in her name and most of the other ones. I don't think she knows how to write but a couple numbers.
    My son didn't know any of that stuff when he started kindergarten and he did great. He learned all his sounds and stuff in school last year and learned to write his full name (I had taught him his first name). That was all they worked on (didn't do reading or anything) so I'm teaching him to read this summer. He's been working at it a week and doing pretty good.
    justanotherjen

    Answer by justanotherjen at 9:21 PM on Jul. 2, 2008

  • i usually leave blanks for him to fill from 1-50. He can account all the way up to 100 because his brother always talking about 100,000 million. I know big different. He writes his name since he was 3 1/2, but he most definitely can't draw! Jellyfish looking people and no changing of his drawing since he was 3.
    yoshiki56

    Answer by yoshiki56 at 7:02 AM on Jul. 5, 2008

  • My first child was exceptional when it came to this stuff...he was reading fluently by the time he was three. Reading and writing came naturally for him. He learned his first letters off wheel of fortune and I heard him say two of them before he could talk. That was when I realized it. But teachers were always careful to tell me that socially, he was not there. There are many factors involved in child development. Reading and writing are important, but not the be-all and end-all. Work with your child for about five each day and make it fun... they will learn. My daughter learned to write her name on Valentine Cards when she was just three. She saw her brother writing his, and became determined to write her own. Today, that will power has taken her far.
    mapleleafwoman

    Answer by mapleleafwoman at 7:48 AM on Jul. 5, 2008

  • My son just turned 5 last mo and he can write his name if he wants to but he is very stuborn. His Pre-K teacher said he is doing real good for her and he can write most all the abc and 123's for her not me. LOL
    kerriwebb

    Answer by kerriwebb at 6:29 PM on Jul. 12, 2008

  • I found success teaching my stepson when he was 5 by letting him choose 3 words each day he wanted to spell. He picked words like "dinosaur" "tractor" etc. I got to pick the bonus word for each day for which he received a star for completing and to make sure he worked on all letters. This stopped the fights over doing practice for school 30 minutes a day the summer before he entered kindergarden. By the end of the summer, he could write his name, write some of the words, and even recognize the others when he saw them.
    Eawest

    Answer by Eawest at 5:24 PM on Aug. 11, 2008

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