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Still Need Help.....

Afternoon ladies I a back yet again. Wondering what in the world can I do to help my 6 year old focus at school and home? My mate and I find ourselves telling her the same thing to do over and over again. Not only that the progress reports we receive from school pretty much says the same thing. We have tried taking things away from her, giving her more assignments at home, sitting down and talking to her and nothing is helping. I am lost and could really use some help from moms who have gone through this with their children. I would like to know what methods you used and did they help? Thanks in advance ladies....

Answer Question
 
lpeaches226

Asked by lpeaches226 at 11:48 AM on Sep. 26, 2010 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

Level 3 (15 Credits)
Answers (11)
  • The focusing issue could be ADD. Give her some coffee & see if she reacts to the stimulant. True ADD kids will not get hyper after drinking the coffee. My son who has it could only do his school work in short time incriments. He still managed to get all A's! Good luck
    mrsmom110

    Answer by mrsmom110 at 11:52 AM on Sep. 26, 2010

  • Thank you for your comment. The issue is not that she is hyper...it is more like her not being able to follow directions because EVERY time she is asked to do something at school or at home she stares around the room vs getting it done.
    lpeaches226

    Comment by lpeaches226 (original poster) at 11:58 AM on Sep. 26, 2010

  • i was goin to say the same thing..sound like ADD..i have it..i just dont do the coffee thing cause i hate the taste an smell...i still managed to make it up to my 2yr of college..reasearch ADD..an then contact a Advocate Lawyer or GAL or special ed coordinator an see if they can have her tested an get a 502 or IEP which ever u think she needs more...
    sound like a 502 but ask the school
    FreeSpriT4eva

    Answer by FreeSpriT4eva at 12:42 PM on Sep. 26, 2010

  • If it is across the board like that, I would suggest testing for issues like ADD. Have her eyes been tested? Do you know that she is reading at grade level? Is she understanding the material? If she is having trouble in any of those areas then her lack of focus could be a way of avoiding what is too hard for her. However, the advice you got about breaking things into smaller segments is good too. Some kids have a shelf life. Working around it may be difficult at first but could be rewarding.
    Liansmommie

    Answer by Liansmommie at 4:18 PM on Sep. 26, 2010

  • Put it on a chart, a list...the things she is ecpected to do...when you do this, you give them the power and ability to control.
    Radarma

    Answer by Radarma at 11:33 PM on Sep. 26, 2010

  • Liansmommie the work she is given she understands and masters it. She is in the 1st grade and is currently reading on a 3rd grade level. There are no other areas we have an issue with but her focusing. She is not a hyper child AT ALL.
    lpeaches226

    Comment by lpeaches226 (original poster) at 12:22 PM on Sep. 27, 2010

  • do the caffiene thing it also helps kids who have AD(H)D focus. I have it and I was self-medicating with pepsi. You can use coffee or any other type of drink that has caffeine (soda, energy drinks etc) When she studies at home make sure there are no distractions like radios, tv etc give her a quiet place to study. I would talk to her doctor about her distractions etc. Kids who have AD(H)D usually are very very smart. You should have her tested. AD(H)D tends to run in families.
    justgrape723

    Answer by justgrape723 at 1:22 PM on Sep. 27, 2010

  • Have you considered that she is bored with it and just doesn't feel like concentrating? My older son was reading at a 7th grade level at 1st grade, and could do multiplication and long division in 1st grade. The teacher thought he was ADD because he never paid attention and when she would call him he would give her smart answers (like what is the weather like today - yea my kid would joke because he freaking didn't need or care to know that it was raining and you need an umbrella). By 2nd grade the teacher noticed his lack of focus as a lack of interest due to the work, so she gave him harder work along with the normal assignments or instead of. My son had issues sitting still - he had to stand to take tests and sometimes read, he chewed on things and daydreamed alot and talked a ton. I'd suggest testing to see where she falls in each academic area and see if its boredom vs ADD.
    blessedwboysx3

    Answer by blessedwboysx3 at 3:04 PM on Sep. 27, 2010

  • Anyway - the short of it is the teachers had to adjust to him and his behavior. Once I figured it out, I would meet right when the school year started with the teacher, talk through the challenges and his behaviors along with his unique advanced in various areas. I requested harder work, I requested more responsbilities and expressed that asking him to do things that were out of his character were gonna cause some problems. All teachers accepted this and even thought he was funny and a good kid to be around.
    He's 16 now and all teachers talk about how wonderful is and how much of a leader he is and how much knowledge he has. If it turns into something of this nature, you have to foster it now and you'll get the most of out her. ADD isn't a bad idea to look into but sometimes that's just not the case with more gifted children.
    blessedwboysx3

    Answer by blessedwboysx3 at 3:07 PM on Sep. 27, 2010

  • 6 year olds often lack attention. Let's face it, paying attention takes practice and effort. Establish predictable routines. Insist on regular bedtime/adequate rest-insufficient sleep can cause attention problems. Limit TV viewing -too much may change brain patterns & make it harder for a child to concentrate in school. Insist that your child get some physical exercise every day..Spend some time working w/ her & showing her how to solve problems systematically. Play a game, start a project, take up a hobby, such as model building or cooking together. Talk together about the steps you take to attack each problem.Let attention span develop naturally by also allowing time for a child to become actively engaged in a task without interruption.
    aliceinalgonac

    Answer by aliceinalgonac at 3:33 PM on Sep. 27, 2010

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