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how can i sleep my baby with safe

my baby is 1 year old

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resmi1

Asked by resmi1 at 12:20 PM on Sep. 30, 2010 in Babies (0-12 months)

Level 1 (2 Credits)
Answers (6)
  • At one, your baby can sleep safely in your bed with minimal issues.
    BradenIsMySon

    Answer by BradenIsMySon at 12:22 PM on Sep. 30, 2010

  • I've slept with my kids until they were 4. Just put him in the middle.
    mompam

    Answer by mompam at 12:22 PM on Sep. 30, 2010

  • The middle is the worst place to put your baby!

    The Dos of cosleeping
    DOS: * Take precautions to prevent baby from rolling out of bed, even though it is unlikely when baby is sleeping next to mother. Like heat-seeking missiles, babies automatically gravitate toward a warm body. Yet, to be safe, place baby between mother and a guardrail or push the mattress flush against the wall and position baby between mother and the wall. Guardrails enclosed with plastic mesh are safer than those with slats, which can entrap baby's limbs or head. Be sure the guardrail is flush against the mattress so there is no crevice that baby could sink into.

    (continued in next answer)
    SmileyMoo

    Answer by SmileyMoo at 12:29 PM on Sep. 30, 2010

  • # Place baby adjacent to mother, rather than between mother and father. Mothers we have interviewed on the subject of sharing sleep feel they are so physically and mentally aware of their baby's presence even while sleeping, that it's extremely unlikely they would roll over onto their baby. Some fathers, on the other hand, may not enjoy the same sensitivity of baby's presence while asleep; so it is possible they might roll over on or throw out an arm onto baby. After a few months of sleep-sharing, most dads seem to develop a keen awareness of their baby's presence.
    # Place baby to sleep on his back.
    DON'TS:

    * Do not sleep with your baby if:

    1. You are under the influence of any drug (such as alcohol or tranquilizing medications) that diminishes your sensitivity to your baby's presence. If you are drunk or drugged, these chemicals lessen your arousability from sleep.
    SmileyMoo

    Answer by SmileyMoo at 12:30 PM on Sep. 30, 2010

  • #

    3. You are exhausted from sleep deprivation. This lessens your awareness of your baby and your arousability from sleep.

    4. You are breastfeeding a baby on a cushiony surface, such as a waterbed or couch. An exhausted mother could fall asleep breastfeeding and roll over on the baby.

    5. You are the child's baby-sitter. A baby-sitter's awareness and arousability is unlikely to be as acute as a mother's.
    # Don't allow older siblings to sleep with a baby under nine months. Sleeping children do not have the same awareness of tiny babies as do parents, and too small or too crowded a bed space is an unsafe sleeping arrangement for a tiny baby.
    # Don't fall asleep with baby on a couch. Baby may get wedged between the back of the couch and the larger person's body, or baby's head may become buried in cushion crevices or soft cushions.
    SmileyMoo

    Answer by SmileyMoo at 12:31 PM on Sep. 30, 2010


    • Do not sleep with baby on a free-floating, wavy waterbed or similar "sinky" surface in which baby could suffocate.

    • Don't overheat or overbundle baby. Be particularly aware of overbundling if baby is sleeping with a parent. Other warm bodies are an added heat source.

    • Don't wear lingerie with string ties longer than eight inches. Ditto for dangling jewelry. Baby may get caught in these entrapments.

    • Avoid pungent hair sprays, deodorants, and perfumes. Not only will these camouflage the natural maternal smells that baby is used to and attracted to, but foreign odors may irritate and clog baby's tiny nasal passages. Reserve these enticements for sleeping alone with your spouse.

    • http://www.askdrsears.com/html/7/T070600.asp#T070601

    SmileyMoo

    Answer by SmileyMoo at 12:33 PM on Sep. 30, 2010

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