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Public schools reflect the community, right?

People often say that you should send your kids to school so they can interact with a diverse group of people. But, the local public school only reflects the diversity of the community in which it is built. So if you live in a high class, mostly white community, your kids are only going to school with other high class, mostly white students. Where's the diversity?

Also, if you live in a diverse community, with a mix of all races, the home-schooled kids live in that same community. While they are out and about during the day, they are interacting with the same mix of races outside of school, as your kids are mixing with in the school. The only difference is, your kids are in a highly structured environment, where as my kids are not. They still mix with the same types of people though.

So can you really say that home-schooled kids cannot be exposed to diversity with out attending school?

Answer Question
 
my2.5boys

Asked by my2.5boys at 10:20 AM on Oct. 2, 2010 in General Parenting

Level 17 (4,394 Credits)
Answers (15)
  • In my experience parents rarely send their kids out to interact with other kids in the neighborhood. Most kids stay home and play on the pc or other game consoles anymore. There is no "go outside and make friends" anymore.
    SalemWitchChild

    Answer by SalemWitchChild at 10:22 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

  • Home-schooled children are well rounded. I have home-schooled and my children interact with others in and around our home. My children don't have friends on our street. But they have friends from all over the area.
    martinmommy26

    Answer by martinmommy26 at 10:28 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

  • It's not the same. Because if my daughter went to public school she would be in a class with at least 15 different kids, she would hear and see situations about each one of them, she would have to co operate with them regardless their social class, race, sex and she would see the problems of a small community.

    A homeschool child in the same area would only be friends with a few kids, they would be able to interact with them if they wanted to and they would not be a part of a small community and have a life outside of their house.
    mygirlpaige

    Answer by mygirlpaige at 10:32 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

  • mygirlpaige, I am not talking about having friends, specifically. I am talking about mixing with other cultures, which my home-schooled kids do daily. They go to the grocery store, and talk to the workers. The park, the bank, the post office, the fire station, the bowling alley, all places with in our community, where the people of our community work and play. They do learn to cooperate with these people, and they do talk to them, and they see first hand the problems of our community, because they are out and about in it. My kids do have a life outside of the home. They have more of a social life at 4 and 6, than I ever did in 12 years of public school.

    And if you think your kids at school don't pick and choose who they talk to and play with, you are sadly misinformed. Clicks form, even at the earliest ages, in schools.
    my2.5boys

    Comment by my2.5boys (original poster) at 10:41 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

  • my2.5boys
    I'm not saying they don't pick their friends at school, I'm saying they are forced to also cooperate with kids they don't like. And mixing with other cultures doesn't mean talking to them. It means actually mixing with them.
    I am not saying my child is better parented than yours. In fact, she is not in a public school at all. All I am saying is public schools offer experiences that a homeschool child cannot get. And neither can MY daughter who is in a non religious private school and can only interact with people of the same social class as her.
    mygirlpaige

    Answer by mygirlpaige at 10:48 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

  • If mixing isn't talking, than what exactly is it? Interacting, cooperating, sharing ideas, working for a common goal. My kids do all that, while we are out in the community, with people of all races. They don't need to be shoved into a classroom to get those experiences.

    I don't think there is any positive experience a public schooled child can have, that my kids can't have outside of school.
    my2.5boys

    Comment by my2.5boys (original poster) at 10:58 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

  • I believe they are part of the problems when they are in a public school. That is not always positive but is IS one experience our kids will got have.
    mygirlpaige

    Answer by mygirlpaige at 11:00 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

  • I believe they are part of the problems when they are in a public school. That is not always positive but is IS one experience our kids will got have.

    I don't know what you mean? Can you elaborate?
    my2.5boys

    Comment by my2.5boys (original poster) at 11:02 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

  • I'm just saying kids in public schools do experience things our children never will. But on the other hand public school kids will never experience our kids' lives. I'm not saying public school is better than home schooling. I'm just saying it's not the same.
    mygirlpaige

    Answer by mygirlpaige at 11:08 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

  • I think schooling, whether public or private and homeschooling both have their ups and downs. Neither one is better or worse than the other it is only better or worse for each family or child. What works for one family may not work for another, that doesn't make it "wrong" for everyone.
    skittles1108

    Answer by skittles1108 at 11:09 AM on Oct. 2, 2010

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