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Question about the Eucharist

If there was proof that early Christians believed that the bread and wine was literally the body and blood of Christ, would that have an impact on what you believe about Eucharist? (communion)

 
Anna92464

Asked by Anna92464 at 3:31 PM on Oct. 7, 2010 in Religion & Beliefs

Level 24 (18,959 Credits)
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Answers (10)
  • It would not, especially since knowing that some still believe this doesn't change my opinion. Although from what I've read the Eucharist was meant to be more mystical, more moving, than merely being the literal blood and body of Christ. ;)
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 4:51 PM on Oct. 7, 2010

  • John chapter 6 is where Jesus tells His followers that He will give them His flesh and blood to eat. Many of them left, disgusted, and He didn't try to stop them. If He meant it figuratively, wouldn't He say, "Wait! You misunderstood!"? Catholics interpret John 6 literally, and the evidence is that the early Church shared this same belief.
    Iamgr8teful

    Answer by Iamgr8teful at 7:11 PM on Oct. 7, 2010

  • Ignatious of Antioch wrote in AD 110:


    "I have no taste for corruptible food nor for the pleasures of this life. I desire the bread of God, which is the flesh of Jesus Christ, who was of the seed of David; and for drink I desire his blood, which is love incorruptible."


    "They abstain from the Eucharist and from prayer because they do not confess that the Eucharist is the flesh of our Savior Jesus Christ, flesh which suffered for our sins and which that Father, in his goodness, raised up again."

    flatlanderjenn

    Answer by flatlanderjenn at 8:44 PM on Oct. 7, 2010

  • *sorry, lol, I meant from what I've read early Christians intended it to be more .... etc etc :)
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 4:51 PM on Oct. 7, 2010

  • Justin Martyr wrote in AD 151:


    "We call this food Eucharist, and no one else is permitted to partake of it, except one who believes our teaching to be true…is both the flesh and the blood of that incarnated Jesus"

    flatlanderjenn

    Answer by flatlanderjenn at 8:45 PM on Oct. 7, 2010

  • Irenaeus wrote in AD 189:


    When, therefore, the mixed cup and the baked bread receives the Word of God and becomes the Eucharist, the body of Christ, and from these the substance of our flesh is increased and supported, how can they say that the flesh is not capable of receiving the gift of God, which is eternal life-flesh which is nourished by the body and blood of the Lord, and is in fact a member of him?"

    flatlanderjenn

    Answer by flatlanderjenn at 8:46 PM on Oct. 7, 2010

  • Augustine wrote in AD 411:


    “That bread which you see on the altar, having been sanctified by the word of God, is the body of Christ. That chalice, or rather, what is in that chalice, having been sanctified by the word of God, is the blood of Christ."

    flatlanderjenn

    Answer by flatlanderjenn at 8:46 PM on Oct. 7, 2010

  • In addition to Iamgr8tefuls excellent biblical reference of John 6, Paul wrote in 1 Cor 10:16, "The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread which we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ?" So when we receive Communion, we actually participate in the body and blood of Christ, not just eat symbols of them. Paul also said in 1 Cor 11:27,29, "Therefore whoever eats the bread and drinks the cup of the Lord unworthily will have to answer for the body and blood of the Lord. . . . For any one who eats and drinks without discerning the body, eats and drinks judgment on himself" 'To answer for the body and blood' of someone meant to be guilty of a crime as serious as homicide. Paul’s comment makes sense only if the bread and wine became the real body and blood of Christ.

    flatlanderjenn

    Answer by flatlanderjenn at 8:54 PM on Oct. 7, 2010

  • dont think so
    san78

    Answer by san78 at 4:29 PM on Oct. 8, 2010

  • I believe that partaking of the bread and the wine is symbolic of Jesus flesh and blood, and not literal. Just like when James said " the tongue is a fire." It is a metaphor. God is a Rock, but not literally speaking.
    69humblepie

    Answer by 69humblepie at 11:43 PM on Oct. 7, 2010