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Don't you agree - a picture is worth 1,000 words?

For you photography buffs, a link to Picturing the Crisis, By PAUL REYES.
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/12/picturing-the-crisis/

One of the ways we remember an economic crisis is through images. Think of the Great Depression, told through the black-and-white portraits of men in bread lines, or wearing placards that beg for work; of a Wall Street suit hocking his car to pay for food; of Hoovervilles.

 
tasches

Asked by tasches at 6:54 PM on Oct. 13, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 48 (298,202 Credits)
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Answers (10)
  • That's oddly profound.
    lovinangels

    Answer by lovinangels at 6:58 PM on Oct. 13, 2010

  • I agree!  A picture IS worth a thousand words!!!


    Picture3.png picture by Elemkay

    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 8:16 PM on Oct. 13, 2010

  • Yes, you are so right, it is very sad and so common now, there are so many more foreclosures, than there are homes in good condition, listed for sale, by the owners. I really wonder if this housing disaster will ever get straightened out, it is such a terrible mess!
    agentwanda

    Answer by agentwanda at 7:32 PM on Oct. 13, 2010

  • As one who has been there, but thankfully was able to save my house, that picture makes me very sad. I'm afraid to look at the rest...
    anime_mom619

    Answer by anime_mom619 at 9:39 PM on Oct. 13, 2010

  • Why worry about friggin' health care now?

    I hope people are satisfied.
    mustbeGRACE

    Answer by mustbeGRACE at 10:48 PM on Oct. 13, 2010

  • "However, I disagree, being poor or being foreclosed on doesn't mean you have to live like a pig the entire time you were there and then finally trash the place when you leave."

    Some of those pictures were of homes that were trashed AFTER the families left. That happens more often than not. Squatters come in and take over, or thieves just break in to see what is left to grab. I admit that some homes are trashed by the previous owners who are angry over the whole thing, but many times (and one of the pictures stated this) it is not the owners, but those who came in afterward. Maybe it's where I live, but when we were looking at homes 6 years ago they were all quite clean. Of course, we were in a position to purchase a home in a higher price ranger at that time, maybe that's why.
    anime_mom619

    Answer by anime_mom619 at 8:05 PM on Oct. 14, 2010

  • In a digital era, the outward signs of economic pain are often hard to capture. Unlike wars or natural disasters, more recent recessions have been largely invisible; government programs and higher per-capita incomes mean that bread lines and absolute destitution are rare occurrences. But if unemployment is less obvious and inflation is not yet an issue, there is one aspect of the Great Recession that has nevertheless caught the photographer’s eye: foreclosures. And while it remains to be seen if it achieves the social and artistic impact of the Depression-era work, foreclosure photography has already helped define an era that will mark American society for decades to come.
    tasches

    Comment by tasches (original poster) at 6:55 PM on Oct. 13, 2010

  • DESCRIPTION

    tasches

    Comment by tasches (original poster) at 6:55 PM on Oct. 13, 2010

  • http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2010/10/12/opinion/20101013_LR_Foreclosure-9.html
    tasches

    Comment by tasches (original poster) at 6:58 PM on Oct. 13, 2010

  • I appreciate your post for your intent. However, I disagree, being poor or being foreclosed on doesn't mean you have to live like a pig the entire time you were there and then finally trash the place when you leave.
    I've been house hunting for over 2 years, and am currently living in a house too small for us because there was not 1 single house in this entire county that was suitable for my freakin dog to live in. I've looked at almost 500 homes in over 2 years and I've seen 2 that I would have bought. I bought the first one.
    These houses were trashed and filthy from the day these families moved in, nobody can tell me that a foreclosure caused someone to let the dog eat the garage door for 3 years, or the kids smear poop on the bathroom walls, or for dog hair to be 3 inches thick under the stove.
    IMO People these days are just filthy pigs and live in trash heaps they call homes.
    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 8:10 AM on Oct. 14, 2010

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