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Church & State, seperate?

WILMINGTON, Del. – Republican Senate nominee Christine O'Donnell of Delaware on Tuesday questioned whether the U.S. Constitution calls for a separation of church and state, appearing to disagree or not know that the First Amendment bars the government from establishing religion.

The exchange came in a debate before an audience of legal scholars and law students at Widener University Law School, as O'Donnell criticized Democratic nominee Chris Coons' position that teaching creationism in public school would violate the First Amendment by promoting religious doctrine.

Coons said private and parochial schools are free to teach creationism but that "religious doctrine doesn't belong in our public schools."

"Where in the Constitution is the separation of church and state?" O'Donnell asked him.

 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 12:35 PM on Oct. 19, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (39)
  • I really didn't need more proof that Christine O'Donnell is a total idiot, but hopefully some of her supporters will see the light after this one... Probably not, though.
    Anouck

    Answer by Anouck at 12:37 PM on Oct. 19, 2010

  • I believe what she was trying to point out is that "separation of church and state" appears no where in the Constitution, and she is correct. Read it for yourself. That phrase does not appear. And while the first ammendment guarantees freedom OF religion, it does not guarantee freedom FROM religion. It also only prohibits the government from establishing a STATE RELIGION; it does not prohibit any religious expression from anyone remotely affiliated with government. I agree that too many Americans are completely uneducated about just what our Constitution says, what it guarantees, and what it does not guarantee.
    ruthie11617

    Answer by ruthie11617 at 12:43 PM on Oct. 19, 2010

  • See? They are already trying to explain away the stoooopid.
    DEpley

    Answer by DEpley at 1:00 PM on Oct. 19, 2010

  • "Fact from the Bible" is an oxymoron... Just sayin'.
    Anouck

    Answer by Anouck at 12:47 PM on Oct. 19, 2010

  • This seems to be a real issue for people. Seperation of church and state has become more of a tag line or paraphrase of the constitution. The constitution only states there will be no governmentally established religion thus creating the freedom to worship as one chooses. The recognition of God as the creator of all things is appropriate to the framers but they were not going to place one religion over another or use religion as government not allow government to interfere with religion. If we teach children about religions of the world (6th or 7th gr social studies) how do we avoid teaching God' creation of all things? This a tenet of any bible based religion. I do believe in the bible as it is written but I too learned about Darwin and the THEORY of evolution. I don't believe you can present one without the other if the point is to EDUCATE.
    jessa1091

    Answer by jessa1091 at 2:18 PM on Oct. 19, 2010

  • She is a strange bird.
    UpSheRises

    Answer by UpSheRises at 12:41 PM on Oct. 19, 2010

  • She is right. The actual wording is the government shall not establish a religion. It says no more. I say there is a huge difference. Besides, both the House and the Senate have a prayer before starting work every day. How is that seperation of church and state?
    itsmesteph11

    Answer by itsmesteph11 at 2:34 PM on Oct. 19, 2010

  • You left out the part where Coons could not name the 5 Principals of the Constitution. She is way smarter than this Lib. All he  knows is tax and spend

    itsmesteph11

    Answer by itsmesteph11 at 2:41 PM on Oct. 19, 2010

  • She is right. The actual wording is the government shall not establish a religion. It says no more. I say there is a huge difference. Besides, both the House and the Senate have a prayer before starting work every day. How is that separation of church and state?

    It's pretty simple, the government as an entity may not make any laws that endorse any religion. Schools and other public agencies are governed by administrative codes, writing those codes is either done by the legislature, or in some cases the legislature grants the agencies the ability to write their own codes, but writing those codes is still an act of legislation. So when a school decides to teach creationism as a serious alternative to students, not only are they trying to pass off creationism as science, they are endorsing that religious argument, which they can't do because they are beholden to the same legislative rules as congress.
    annabellelee

    Answer by annabellelee at 3:02 PM on Oct. 19, 2010

  • I really wish people who decided to run for office were actually educated. It would help. :)
    Mom2Just1

    Answer by Mom2Just1 at 3:53 PM on Oct. 19, 2010