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4 Bumps

How has the change in family dynamics affected the welfare system,

And does it open up the system to fraud that was unintended by the original program?

For instance, it would have been almost unheard of for people to live together prior to marriage when the system was established. People who live with a significant other often lie about it so that his/her income isn't counted toward the income of the household.
How, if at all, has this affected fraud throughout the system, or does the system need to catch up to the standards of today's life? (Is it NOT fraud, because an S/O is legally no more than a roommate, even though, under some state laws that income should still count?)

Answer Question
 
lovinangels

Asked by lovinangels at 12:31 AM on Oct. 24, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 39 (112,638 Credits)
Answers (10)
  • The New Deal began it all and it was designed to help Americans out of a depression, but it never ended. Now it is a crutch that hurts us more than helps us.
    txdaniella

    Answer by txdaniella at 12:33 AM on Oct. 24, 2010

  • Well, truly, yes it is fraud if they don't tell the truth. My daughter wasn't married. When she went to apply for food stamps, they simply asked her if anyone else in the household worked. She said, yes, her boyfriend. That's all it takes, is honesty. I know lots of people don't though. So, my feelings are that yes, it does affect the system and at a very near point in the future, welfare is going to have to change. Also, I believe that at some point, there will be no more help out there.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 12:36 AM on Oct. 24, 2010

  • Way too much fraud, even the internationals are robbing us of millions, heaven only knows, what we don't know about!  We Must be Really DUMB for this crap to be going on!


    http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local-beat/Dozens-Nabbed-in-International-100M-Medicaid-Fraud-Ring-104875219.html


    This is interesting, James Sheehan spoke at the Government Technology Conference on 9/22/2010 at 1:45pm on "The New World of Medicaid Data Mining."


    That "new world thing" just keeps popping up, huh?


    http://omig.ny.gov/data/

    agentwanda

    Answer by agentwanda at 1:15 AM on Oct. 24, 2010

  • depends.. if they have a child together, regardless of it they are married, they are still counted as married as far as benefits go. Without a child between them it can lead to fraud.
    xxhazeldovexx

    Answer by xxhazeldovexx at 2:00 AM on Oct. 24, 2010

  • OP--I think that's the crux of the matter--multiple sources of income "conveniently" not counted. All a young, unmarried mother has to do is CLAIM that the "baby daddy" is not in the picture, when he could be living with them and contributing to all household expenses as much as if they were married!

    It's NOT hard to perform a simple job/address background check using a SS number!! I should think the GOVERNMENT would have access to run quick employment and last known addresses of the "baby daddy" and parents by their social security numbers (especially since nowadays you get a SS number when you are born, not when you get your first job (which was when I was issued a SS number), and if the applicant and the father's addresses match...then bye bye bennies--because of making a fraudulent claim!! MAYBE if there WAS an actual fact checking system in place, THEN maybe that would cut down on fraud?! Just a thought!
    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 7:49 AM on Oct. 24, 2010

  • I think it does. I think a lot more people need it now because our incomes haven't caught up with inflation. More people need it because they are single mothers. I also think there are people who are scamming the system. I didn't know you had to be married to get it, I thought it just mattered who lives in your home.

    mommom2000

    Answer by mommom2000 at 9:48 AM on Oct. 24, 2010

  • It's NOT hard to perform a simple job/address background check using a SS number!! I should think the GOVERNMENT would have access to run quick employment and last known addresses of the "baby daddy" and parents by their social security numbers (especially since nowadays you get a SS number when you are born, not when you get your first job (which was when I was issued a SS number)

    That is how it works here - if there is a father listed on the birth certificate, family services hunts them down for child support the second the mother files for any type of assistance. The work around is people who claim they don't know who the father is and left the space blank on the birth certificate from the start. It's not a great workaround, though, because the benefits run out in 2 years, and that essentially puts them ever collecting support on hold for far longer until they can track the guy down and pay for a paternity test.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 10:50 AM on Oct. 24, 2010

  • In general, just the common acceptance of single motherhood IS putting a far larger strain on the system than was ever intended. Of course, the system was never intended to be permanent either. It shouldn't exist anymore, the way it was originally designed. Add that to the longer life spans that drain social security for decades when it was originally set up with the idea people would maybe live 5 or 10 years after retiring.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 10:52 AM on Oct. 24, 2010

  • Yes, I do think it is the degredation of the American family that has led to so much of the swelling of the welfare roles. There is a mentality, which I don't understand, that you have your children early and THEN find someone to marry. Or, you don't get married at all, you just become "common law" wives/husbands. These children grow up never witnessing a stable relationship btw mom and dad, a committed couple who work together to make one cohesive life. Kids learn how to work the system from their parents who then become adults who learn to work the system even better.........their kids grow up thinking that working the system is the wya of life. Nowhere is there a work ethic or the lesson that working to support you and yours is the honorable way.
    jesse123456

    Answer by jesse123456 at 11:09 AM on Oct. 24, 2010

  • That is an excellent question, and you raise a valid point. I had a former landlord who told me not to tell anyone that his ex-wife was living with him because it would reduce their benefits. I can think of several changes in family dynamics in the past few decades that impact the welfare system: people having sex younger and with more people, single motherhood being more common and dads ditching their responsibilities, and non-custodial fathers not paying child support.
    Iamgr8teful

    Answer by Iamgr8teful at 7:54 PM on Oct. 24, 2010

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