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Did you know Relentless attackers are trying to hack into home and office networks in the U.S. "millions of times a day, 24/7?

DENVER – A new Air Force manual for cyberwarfare describes a shadowy, fast-changing world where anonymous enemies can carry out devastating attacks in seconds and where conventional ideas about time and space don't apply.

Much of the 62-page manual is a dry compendium of definitions, acronyms and explanations of who reports to whom. But it occasionally veers into scenarios that sound more like computer games than flesh-and-blood warfare.

Enemies can cloak their identities and hide their attacks amid the cascade of data flowing across international computer networks, it warns.

Relentless attackers are trying to hack into home and office networks in the U.S. "millions of times a day, 24/7."

 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 8:57 AM on Oct. 25, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (8)
  • I doubt it's 'outdated' The structure of the internet hasen't changed overnight. There's no reason to classify this information. In fact, it would be counter productive. Each user is an 'in', each computer can be harnessed with a well placed virus to become a drone machine issuing denial of service attacks, so we are each responsible for our own security and the safety of other users. The more we know about the dangers out there, hopefully the more aware we will be.
    While the decentralized nature of the internet is it's strongest defense, but the more well informed the users are, the better.
    Jenny-talia

    Answer by Jenny-talia at 9:44 AM on Oct. 25, 2010

  • LOL "relentless hackers". Convenient they don't mention that most of those "relentless hackers" are employed by the Chinese and N Korean governments and work shifts 24/7 with crews of several thousand.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 8:59 AM on Oct. 25, 2010

  • Any technical info would be outdated by now, so that doesn't matter. The rest of it, hierarchies and definitions, isn't really something that needs to be classified.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 9:09 AM on Oct. 25, 2010

  • That whole thing sounds eally strange and it makes me wonder what the heck are they doing and if they are really paranoid? Or if they just like drama? Crazy stuff.
    kerp1960

    Answer by kerp1960 at 10:12 AM on Oct. 25, 2010

  • http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101025/ap_on_re_us/us_cyberwarfare_manual


    And operating in cyberspace "may require abandoning common assumptions concerning time and space" because attacks can come from anywhere and take only seconds, the manual says.


    The manual — officially, "Cyberspace Operations: Air Force Doctrine Document 3-12" — is dated July 15 but wasn't made public until this month. It is unclassified and available on the Internet.


    It dwells mostly on protecting U.S. military computer networks and makes little mention of attacking others. That could signal the Pentagon wants to keep its offensive plans secret, or that its chief goal is fending off cyberattacks to keep its networks up and running, analysts said.

    sweet-a-kins

    Comment by sweet-a-kins (original poster) at 8:57 AM on Oct. 25, 2010

  • The manual — officially, "Cyberspace Operations: Air Force Doctrine Document 3-12" — is dated July 15 but wasn't made public until this month. It is unclassified and available on the Internet.


    I don't get the above...^^^ WTH?

    sweet-a-kins

    Comment by sweet-a-kins (original poster) at 9:04 AM on Oct. 25, 2010

  • kerp- there's a program you should get called PeerGuardian. It blocks requests from certain IP addresses (it's got a built-in list, and you can add your own) and you would be AMAZED at what you will see. I pulled up it's log yesterday and just watched all the pings. Stuff from DoD, foreign IP's...you name it. Now, not every one of those is a hacker per say, but they are all people attempting to connect to your computer for one reason or another.
    Jenny-talia

    Answer by Jenny-talia at 10:43 AM on Oct. 25, 2010

  • Yep, They had a news segment on our local news where they interviewed people who investigated things like this for big companies. One of them said most large companies have people hired to take care of these threats because they happen on a daily basis. Really, it's pretty scary when you think about it.
    itsmesteph11

    Answer by itsmesteph11 at 3:43 PM on Oct. 25, 2010

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