Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

3 Bumps

Do you think sometimes teachers will say they think your kid has a learning issue, when they just can't get them to learn at the same pace as others?

Answer Question
 
tucson.mary

Asked by tucson.mary at 7:11 AM on Oct. 30, 2010 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

Level 5 (72 Credits)
Answers (9)
  • In an ideal teaching/learning envioronment, every child would be taught at the apporpriate level for them. B/C schools dont have this luxury, most of the time teachers teach to the mid to lower end of the learning sectrum. If a child is having difficulties, suggesting further testing could be helpful in identifying any learning disabilities & getting the right help for that child. Things like tutoring & modifying the work given to the child can help them succeed & not get further behind. Most teachers want to help when they see a possible need for intervention. Even tho this usually means more work for them to modify work for some students. But they are under a lot of pressure to keep student performance high. It's good to ask questions & form a partnership w/ the school/teacher to work on a plan to help your child. We as parents need to work WITH the schools/teachers more now than ever.
    mrsmom110

    Answer by mrsmom110 at 7:25 AM on Oct. 30, 2010

  • Since teachers can't teach each kid individually, if one kid isn't keeping up with the majority, it is, within the classroom, a "learning issue." Is it a "disability?" Maybe, maybe not, but it is an "issue."
    SWasson

    Answer by SWasson at 7:30 AM on Oct. 30, 2010

  • If a child struggles with keeping up with the majority of the class, it IS a learning issue.

    I am a special education teacher. If a child learns differently than the norm, it is often referred to as a 'disability' (I have often said it's not necessarily a disability, just a learning difference, but that's not the topic). This does not mean the child can not learn, it just means they need to learn differently.

    If a teacher is telling you your child has a learning issue, they are trying to help. They want the child to do well, but often they need your help, too.( and this is legally as well as emotionally) It's not just them putting it off on the child because the teacher can't get them to learn.
    layh41407

    Answer by layh41407 at 8:00 AM on Oct. 30, 2010

  • I agree completely with Layh. I am also a an ESE teacher. The pace set by the schools is attainable for the vast majority kids, that's how the pace is determined. In fact, most kids actually learn more material in any given time frame then what is required. If a child isn't meeting the minimumrequirements that's an indication of an underlying problem.

    maxswolfsuit

    Answer by maxswolfsuit at 9:11 AM on Oct. 30, 2010

  • Just because a child doesn't learn like the majority does not mean they have a learning disability. They usually just need a different approach.
    buzymamaof3

    Answer by buzymamaof3 at 10:14 AM on Oct. 30, 2010

  • I don't think most teachers (adequate ones anyway) are out to just label a child without cause. Usually concerns are grounded in truth.
    cleanaturalady

    Answer by cleanaturalady at 3:51 PM on Oct. 31, 2010

  • I am sure there may be some teachers out there that are like that, yes, but I feel like most teachers generally do have the child's best interest at heart and a competent and experienced teacher will be able to recognize signs of learning issues and will try to address them so the child can get the help they need.
    KTMOM

    Answer by KTMOM at 8:42 PM on Oct. 31, 2010

  • i think that there is an issue if your child can't keep up with others... does that mean that it's a disabilitly? no... but it is an issue for your child, the teacher, and the others in the class.. you wouldn't want your child to fall behind because the teacher can not spend individual time with them...
    asil

    Answer by asil at 10:25 PM on Oct. 31, 2010

  • yes
    dorispierce

    Answer by dorispierce at 1:03 PM on Nov. 6, 2010

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.
close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN