Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

4 Bumps

"wise men wouldn't know what you were talking about if you said December"

The other question regarding Dec 25th closed before I had a chance to respond to this, so I am posting it here.

"Gal... uhm... hun there was no such thing as December back then. The modern day calendar didn't exist until centuries later. So the "wise men" wouldn't know what you were talking about if you said "December"
(Comment by Anon)

Do you think I don't know that?? What I was saying, is that using OUR calendar, and looking at the stars back during that time (which the documentary explains how they determine the correct time frame), it can be determined that the Wise Men/Magi arrived in Bethlehem on Dec 25th. It has zero meaning to the people of that time, but it DOES have meaning for us, and the science of astronomy can prove this.

Here are parts 4 and 5 of the documentary called "Star of Bethlehem."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFitxMhTPko&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZOY6E2U_4k&feature=related

 
Gal51

Asked by Gal51 at 10:38 AM on Nov. 3, 2010 in Religious Debate

Level 23 (15,495 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (41)
  • I don't think you can truly state that the science of astronomy proves this theory since there are astronomers who have evidence Christ was born in June or September. I think it is quite an unbelievable coincidence that the day the magi visited Jesus would be the exact same day the Roman church chose to celebrate his birth, which was done deliberately to infiltrate the pagan holiday and traditions.

    Regardless, in my opinion, not knowing the exact date of Christ's birth takes nothing away from Christmas. Dec 25th is the day it's celebrated, and that should be enough for Christians and non-Christians alike.
    KelleyP77

    Answer by KelleyP77 at 11:05 AM on Nov. 3, 2010

  • It's interesting that some christians seem to be very willing to use scientific--or rather pseudo-scientific--proof if it serves their purposes. Yes, astronomically, the conjunction that would have had to form the "star" that the magi followed would have occurred sometime between the end of March to the beginning of Sept. in the year 2-4 a.d. No such star would have--or has EVER--appeared in the month of December near the supposed time of the birth of Jesus, nor would the the shepherds have been out with their sheep in that bitterly cold month. But they would have in the springtime. Of course, I have a computer so I can research these things and not just rely on "facts" from someone else who got it from someone else, who got it...well, you know.
    witchqueen

    Answer by witchqueen at 12:00 PM on Nov. 3, 2010

  • No, by looking at the stars you'd see that the "birth of Christ" happened in springtimel.
    ballewal

    Answer by ballewal at 10:40 AM on Nov. 3, 2010

  • It bears repeating: I think it is quite an unbelievable coincidence that the day the magi visited Jesus would be the exact same day the Roman church chose to celebrate his birth, which was done deliberately to infiltrate the pagan holiday and traditions.
    KelleyP77

    Answer by KelleyP77 at 11:30 AM on Nov. 3, 2010

  • Actually, Jesus wasn't born in December...December 25th was a date adopted by the early Christians to coincide with the end of the Roman holiday of Saturnalia so they would be more willing to convert to Christianity.

    Sharon
    momto2boys973

    Answer by momto2boys973 at 12:07 PM on Nov. 3, 2010

  • "That the Magi arrived in Bethlehem to see Jesus on Dec 25th. The Magi did NOT arrive on Christ's birth but a few months after."

    Well then, that would be somewhat impressive if Christianity actually celebrated the arrival of the wise men on December 25th. But that's not what they celebrate, is it? Living in Mexico I'm well aware that the "official" date to celebrate the wise men is January 6th. As it is, it just seems to me someone is poking too much trying to make the story plausible.

    Sharon
    momto2boys973

    Answer by momto2boys973 at 2:15 PM on Nov. 3, 2010

  • Seriously, who cares- the point is WHAT is celebrated not when... heck when my birthday falls on a Weds we celebrate it the following Saturday.... we celebrate my Mothers bday a month late so we can all be together (we all fly in when school gets out for the kids) so does that mean my Mom was never born or that the celebration is any less valid- heck we even probably celebrate it on some other beliefs systems holiday- who cares... celebrate and enjoy- why would anyone let someone else take the joy out of their Christmas? And why would anyone want to take the joy out of someone elses celebration? Sounds pretty silly to me!
    soyousay

    Answer by soyousay at 4:01 PM on Nov. 3, 2010

  • Hmmm I am wondering what the heck?
    mmmegan38

    Answer by mmmegan38 at 10:40 AM on Nov. 3, 2010

  • By reading the BIBLE you will find that He was born in OUR autumn.... :-) Look at the times of the feasts that were celebrated at that time.
    Ill have to look into when the Astronomers arrived.
    Shaneagle777

    Answer by Shaneagle777 at 10:52 AM on Nov. 3, 2010

  • Well, seeing as the whole thing is a fiction, why do you care when it was? It is a very nice,inspiring story written a few hundred years AFTER the fact and promoted as a 'truth' but unless you were THERE, you don't know for certain about any of it.
    kerp1960

    Answer by kerp1960 at 11:10 AM on Nov. 3, 2010