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10 Bumps

More info..Long but please answer.

My son was born with Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia (NAIT). Along with some other issues that were minor. He was transferred to a more capable hospital and stayed there for 10 days. He was sent home as soon as his platelets seemed to be on the consistent rise. He's now 4 months and now since things settled down I have been more curious and worried about this disorder. Has anyone had to experience this? Is this something that can affect him later in life? My 4 year old did not have this, and is big, after my husband. Hes' always been in the high % with height and weight. This one was only in the 25 % at his 2 month appointment. I know that all babies are different but could this be an effect from his birth problem. Also like to add that I had 2 miscarriages before him which I feel is relevent to mention (as I beleive some miscarriages are do to genetic abnormalities, as is this disorder that my darling had.)

Answer Question
 
mlmsm928

Asked by mlmsm928 at 3:50 PM on Nov. 15, 2010 in Kids' Health

Level 17 (4,297 Credits)
Answers (7)
  • I am sorry you have not received any answers yet. I got nothing for you but I will give you a bump.
    Peajewel

    Answer by Peajewel at 8:13 PM on Nov. 15, 2010

  • I'm sorry, I too do not have an answer...BUMP
    tracylyn245

    Answer by tracylyn245 at 10:23 PM on Nov. 15, 2010

  • I found this website that addresses the long term effects of the disorder

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17094038

    I hope it helps. My understanding is that with treatment, children did well in the longterm, but with no treatment there was the risk of bleeding in the brain and also of vision problems. It seems like this is not a problem for your son since they caught it and treated it.

    The problem would be for a future pregnancy. The next baby ( if you have any more) would be at higher risk of the disorder but could be treated prenatally by giving you shots or gammaglobulin or steroids so the fetus grows more platelets.
    RedRowan

    Answer by RedRowan at 10:30 PM on Nov. 15, 2010

  • I hope that you find the answers that you need. My prayers go out to you.
    philsangel

    Answer by philsangel at 10:43 AM on Nov. 16, 2010

  • My DH has ITP and my BOTH kids have Von Willebrands -- You cant change your Genes---:( I think we deal rather well with out clotting issues I've learned SOOOO much in doing my own research that now I tell the hematologist about plans of care LOL but here's what I say for you.. go to your local big hospital-- find their library-- and go do some research of your own so that you have the best understanding possible of it -ask their librarian for help in your topic search
    MELRN

    Answer by MELRN at 10:55 AM on Nov. 16, 2010

  • bumping for you
    Ashlynnsmommy07

    Answer by Ashlynnsmommy07 at 1:53 AM on Nov. 18, 2010

  • I'm sorry. Praying for answers soon!
    sstepph

    Answer by sstepph at 9:09 AM on Dec. 14, 2010

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