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"Raising a sensitive child"

My 6yr. old daughter is way too sensitive, crying all the time or getting mad so easy, i am going nuts.. last night we went to the grocery store and her eyes started getting watery when i said no to something she wanted...i did research and found this article "Raising a sensitive child" and said she was gifted, she feels what other kids are feeling and if the teacher reads a story or she watches a movie with a baby raccoon going to his first day of school and will miss his mommy.. she would feel what the raccoon is feeling, which is good because she puts herself in other peoples shoes.. but i still think she is too young for this what should i do or how would u handle this situation... thanks in advance!

 
nicoleNjeanna

Asked by nicoleNjeanna at 1:38 PM on Nov. 17, 2010 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

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Answers (12)
  • Thanks for the information. My 6 year old son is also quick to well up with tears, especially when he's in trouble. But I don't think he fits the other criteria that article offers. Still good to know!
    Good luck with your dd!
    ARmom

    Answer by ARmom at 3:07 PM on Nov. 17, 2010

  • Sensitive does absolutely not equal "gifted", nor does it rule it out.
    Sensitive may mean emotionally sensitive or it may mean environmentally sensitive, but it does not mean crying when told "no".
    aliceinalgonac

    Answer by aliceinalgonac at 1:43 PM on Nov. 17, 2010

  • Although my son is only 3, I used to be overly sensitive as a child also - my son has this problem now already. He gets quite embarressed when being told no - its not that he is mad that he didn't get his way, he's thoroughly embarressed about it - no matter how I tell him no. It comes out more in so many other ways that the store is the least of what I see - he gets very sad about Toy story 1 and 2 when there are sad moments.. he runs over to me and almost in tears says " its so sad, he's just so sad" he gets over stimulated and over emotional about almost everything on a daily basis.. its very hard to understand and my heart breaks for his worry and stress
    maxsmom11807

    Answer by maxsmom11807 at 1:51 PM on Nov. 17, 2010

  • I'm with you on the empathy thing,but crying because she doesn't get her way is not an empathetic child,that's a child who is manipulative
    butterflyblue19

    Answer by butterflyblue19 at 1:41 PM on Nov. 17, 2010

  • to butterflyblue 19
    ~I've said no a lot of times and it wasn't an issue then, now it has become this rare attitude..
    nicoleNjeanna

    Comment by nicoleNjeanna (original poster) at 1:44 PM on Nov. 17, 2010

  • your not alone. My dd is 5.5 we have an app. at the dr Monday because I can't take it anymore. I almost thought she might have depression since it runs in my family and I have it. You cannot tell her anything without her crying. DH one day asked what she was doing after she asked me if she can get her blocks outside. He didn't yell at her or anything and she started crying. You tell her no she crys. One day my sister and bil took her to get mcdonalds and they asked her if she wanted hamburg or chicken nuggets she said hamburg then they asked her 3 times if she wanted fries or apples she wouldn't answer so bil said apples she started crying cause she wanted fries, but she wouldn't answer him. It is very frusterating
    mommy5409

    Answer by mommy5409 at 1:54 PM on Nov. 17, 2010

  • i don't think my daughter needs meds.. but i do think that is a stage... and i already talked to her teacher @ parent's conference meeting and she totally agree's with me i just want to know if someone else went through the same and has experience with this and can hopefully give some advice.
    nicoleNjeanna

    Comment by nicoleNjeanna (original poster) at 2:10 PM on Nov. 17, 2010

  • If it were my child I would try very hard to protect her from things that would cause her concern- sad parts of a movie or story, talking about things in front of her that she may dwell on later, etc. As for the crying thing, is it like a temper tantrum crying or she gets upset and cries? Because if it is just getting upset I think you just let her have her moment, maybe a quick hug and telling her you're sorry not getting the toy upsets her but there will be other times for toys. You don't have to give in but you can give a quick and gentle reassurance to her. Some kids are just more sensitive and I think it requires a combination of protecting them from exposure to things when you can, and a respect for how they feel. Telling her to get over it, for example, will only make her feel worse. If something makes her sad then that is a valid feeling that she is entitled to. Good luck with this- hopefully it passes.
    MaryMW

    Answer by MaryMW at 2:20 PM on Nov. 17, 2010

  • It may benefit her to be enrolled in some type of martial arts or sport- something to help build confidence and assertiveness. And I think it's important to talk with her about her feelings- if she feels sad about something ask her why and try to find a happy side to the story or something else to focus on as well so she sees that sometimes in life there is sadness but that isn't always the only thing people feel.
    MaryMW

    Answer by MaryMW at 2:22 PM on Nov. 17, 2010

  • You think she's "too young for this"? Too young to feel empathy and express it outwardly? No, she's not too young for that. And she's not too young to manipulate by turning on the tears when she doesn't get what she wants either. It's likely just a phase - and certainly not something to medicate. My middle daughter went through a time when she was easily upset and very sensitive. By talking to her about how she was feeling, asking her to examine why she thought she was responding so strongly, and reminding her that the situation is nothing to cry about (when appropriate), it passed without much difficulty. If you treat it like it's a big deal, it will become one. If you help her learn to regulate her emotions and her responses, she will.
    caseyandkids

    Answer by caseyandkids at 2:23 PM on Nov. 17, 2010