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3 Bumps

Who sets the precedent for pronunciation?

Benjamin Netanyahu used to be just regualy Benjamin...now we say Ben-ha-mean.

Pakistan is now Pock-i-stahn.

Why do we change the way we pronounce things? Cause i feel like a tool sometimes, when i pronounce a word using a dialect that isn't my own.

 
UpSheRises

Asked by UpSheRises at 3:09 PM on Dec. 3, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 31 (48,798 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (23)
  • I just have one name for you......Sylvia Poggioli

    I also feel like a tool pronouncing words in their dialect. I am clearly American so I pronounce words that way - for the most part. I think with names, you pronounce the name the way the person does. With names of countries, I say the names like an American. Now if I get a job on "Morning Edition", we'll see.

    sweetpotato418

    Answer by sweetpotato418 at 4:05 PM on Dec. 3, 2010

  • Pronounciation is a local thing right? like Ne-va-duh and Neh-vah-duh?
    When in Rome......................
    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 3:18 PM on Dec. 3, 2010

  • I don't say Benhamin, I say Benjamin.

    although one of my good friends is English, and I asked my husband to pick up cling film today...
    lovinangels

    Answer by lovinangels at 3:16 PM on Dec. 3, 2010

  • Do you mean precedent?
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:10 PM on Dec. 3, 2010

  • LOL! I declare MYSELF the President of Pronunciation! Can I have an inauguration ceremony now?
    soflashelley

    Answer by soflashelley at 3:10 PM on Dec. 3, 2010

  • You dont "have" to say it that way. You can say it any old way you want. Po-tay-toe....Po-tot-toe
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:11 PM on Dec. 3, 2010

  • Like Uran-us instead of Ur-anus...lol. Nothing makes young boys giggle like Uranus. Which I found out from an old baby einstein dvd on planets. my 4 and 9 yr old ran around the house screaming Ur-anus for an hour.
    MissAlisabeth

    Answer by MissAlisabeth at 3:22 PM on Dec. 3, 2010

  • What? There are different pronunciations everywhere. All I know is, news anchors ate preferred to have a "Midwestern" accent. I have never heard anyone say Ben-ha-min or pok-istan. Ever.
    bloomsr

    Answer by bloomsr at 3:22 PM on Dec. 3, 2010

  • I guess i am thinking more about the national media then actual people
    --
    Probably, I don't watch much tv, but listen to talk radio. With a lesser audience, the commentators tend to stick with a more Americanized version of the foreign words, places, names and issues.
    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 3:24 PM on Dec. 3, 2010

  • What? There are different pronunciations everywhere. All I know is, news anchors ate preferred to have a "Midwestern" accent. I have never heard anyone say Ben-ha-min or pok-istan. Ever.
    ---------
    I hear it all the time, and it's hilarious. These guys totally sounds like these corn-fed white boys from Iowa until an ethnic name comes on the teleprompter, than all of a sudden they're Don Juan or Ming Tsai or whatever. Cracks me up.
    Jenny-talia

    Answer by Jenny-talia at 3:30 PM on Dec. 3, 2010