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How it will the repeal be implemented?

Gays and lesbians will be treated just like any other soldiers, sailors, airmen or marines, the new rules say. But commanders will have some flexibility when they believe it's needed to maintain order and discipline in their units.

As the U.S. military begins to map out how it will implement the new edict allowing gays to serve openly, the first order of business is drafting the regulations. The rule changes under discussion won't dictate how troops feel about the change, but will strictly enforce how they act on it.

[ For complete coverage of politics and policy, go to Yahoo! Politics ]


The Senate voted Saturday to repeal the ban on openly gay service, following earlier action by the House. Fulfilling a 2008 campaign promise, President Barack Obama plans to sign the bill into law on Wednesday at an Interior Department ceremony. But in letters to the troops over the weekend, the four military service chiefs warned that the ban is still in place, and will be for some time to come.

"The implementation and certification process will not happen immediately; it will take time," Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz said in an e-mail to airmen. "Meanwhile, the current law remains in effect. All Air Force members should conduct themselves accordingly."

Answer Question
 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 10:35 AM on Dec. 21, 2010 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
Answers (8)
  • http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_gays_in_military


    Recommendations to implement the repeal were outlined in a 67-page report last month, and now must be formed into concrete regulations. Defense officials said Monday that they still don't know how long it will take before the Pentagon completes its implementation plan and certifies the change will not damage combat readiness. Once certified, the implementation would begin 60 days later.


    The report, however, provides a fairly detailed preview of what troops and the American public can expect, once the new rules are in place.

    sweet-a-kins

    Comment by sweet-a-kins (original poster) at 10:36 AM on Dec. 21, 2010

  • And it puts the heaviest burden on commanders who will have to walk a fine line between enforcing the updated code of military conduct and recognizing when they may need to make some concessions.


    The plans call for strict and immediate action when the new rules are violated. But there is also an emphasis on educating troops who are having problems. For example, in a series of vignettes listed in the report, the first course of action is often counseling.


    What if a recruiter refuses to process recruits who say they are gay? What about a sailor who requests a new sleeping area to get away from a gay roommate? Can a service member file a complaint against a chaplain who preaches against homosexuality? And can a gay or lesbian service member get leave to travel home when their partner is ill?

    sweet-a-kins

    Comment by sweet-a-kins (original poster) at 10:37 AM on Dec. 21, 2010

  • It will be just like when they allowed women in, of course there will be some logistics (like where to pee lol), but those are very minor bumps compared to the much greater good of equal rights for all.
    FelipesMom

    Answer by FelipesMom at 10:57 AM on Dec. 21, 2010

  • Minor bumps LOL! There are hundreds of logistical issues to deal with..where to pee is one of the least of them!

    OP, it is going to take a while. There is also the problem with the UCMJ, which for some reason Congress decided not to address before repealing. This alone is very problematic.

    yourspecialkid

    Answer by yourspecialkid at 11:56 AM on Dec. 21, 2010

  • YSK..are all being addressed..in will take about a year


     theWhat if a recruiter refuses to process recruits who say they are gay? What about a sailor who requests a new sleeping area to get away from a gay roommate? Can a service member file a complaint against a chaplain who preaches against homosexuality? And can a gay or lesbian service member get leave to travel home when their partner is ill?y

    sweet-a-kins

    Comment by sweet-a-kins (original poster) at 12:10 PM on Dec. 21, 2010

  • I understand needing to have all their i's dotted and t's crossed, but at the same time I really don't see some huge amount of problems popping up. If our country would look outside itself for a moment to Canadian, European, and Asian military, they'd see that many countries have gay soldiers serving openly without problem.
    KelleyP77

    Answer by KelleyP77 at 1:16 PM on Dec. 21, 2010

  • A year? Not gonna happen like that.
    itsmesteph11

    Answer by itsmesteph11 at 4:19 PM on Dec. 21, 2010

  • A year?? I don't think so. They haven't even addressed the sister legislation yet. When is that going to happen?

    yourspecialkid

    Answer by yourspecialkid at 8:58 PM on Dec. 21, 2010

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