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Overweight Infants?

I think this is going to the extreme, isn't it called baby fat for a reason?

http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20101231/sc_livescience/athirdof9montholdsalreadyobeseoroverweight

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scout_mom

Asked by scout_mom at 10:48 PM on Jan. 1, 2011 in Kids' Health

Level 41 (125,190 Credits)
Answers (6)
  • I would not qualify any 9 month old obese, however eating habits of a two year old are more disturbing.
    leksismommy

    Answer by leksismommy at 10:56 PM on Jan. 1, 2011

  • I also would not call a 9 month old obese. In the article it said about children being in the 95% for weight were obese, but maybe I missed it, it didn't say what they were for height. When my middle child was an infant he was in the 10% for height but the 60% for weight. He was one fat baby. He just turned three and has averaged out over the years, now in the 5% for both. My oldest son was also chubby but not near as fat as his little brother. When my middle son was born we had oldest at the hospital with us. The pediatrician (who knew us because our 1st son was in the nicu) asked if he was on a diet. What? He was only 13 months old and I didn't think he was fat at all. His regular pediatrician never once said he was overweight and now at 4 he is average.
    JamieLK

    Answer by JamieLK at 11:04 PM on Jan. 1, 2011

  • I call foul on the article and the research. 95th percentile is obese? since when? That just means they are above average in weight. Average being the 50th percentile. And did they take into account the heights of said children which will effect their weight. There is a big difference between a baby that is 50th percentile for height and 95th percentile in weight compared to one that is in the 95th percentile for both. The first baby would look overweight. The 2nd would probably just look tall and skinny. Just comparing weights means nothing.
    My older son hit 20lbs at 8 months which was like 90th percentile or something for weight (he was a 2001 baby) but he was also in the 95th percentile for height. He has always been tall...and big. He's 9 now and 4'7" and 70+lbs. He is so skinny you can see every rib. He's all muscle and no fat.
    justanotherjen

    Answer by justanotherjen at 11:15 PM on Jan. 1, 2011

  • I also do NOT buy the whole breastfeeding will make your kid skinnier or whatever. All 5 of my kids are/were 100% formula fed and not a single one of them is overweight in the least. I even have one that is underweight but we're not worried about her either because she's always been small (she's 10, 4' tall and 50lbs...she's the size of a small 7yo).
    I think there's a whole lot more to the "obesity" thing then what kids ate as infants. Most likely the parents of these overweight kids don't understand nutrition, eat a lot of McDonalds and don't eat vegetables. I'm personally obese and have been most of my life. I have horrible eating habits that I'm still trying to break but I refused to pass those to my kids. They eat healthy (most of the time) and you can tell.
    justanotherjen

    Answer by justanotherjen at 11:19 PM on Jan. 1, 2011

  • It's ridiculous! Don't they know that Breastfeeding babies actually gain weight faster on a larger curve? What weight charts are they using for their "calculations"?

    I think there are actually very very few babies out there that are truly OBESE.

    out of all 4 of my own kids, the ONLY ones that appeared overweight were my breastfed babies! Now go figure that out! Today, all my kids are the perfect size/weight! 17, 15, 10 and 8.
    Roadfamily6now

    Answer by Roadfamily6now at 11:33 PM on Jan. 1, 2011

  • Yeah, this article is misleading. But I only read this article, not the original paper, and I know reporters regularly interpret research wrong (big dramatic headlines and conclusions sell better). They even say that researchers hesitate to categorize kids that young as obese or overweight! It's hard to tell if this is bad journalism or bad research... or both.

    But I completely agree with the idea that we should try to encourage healthy eating from the start rather than wait until we have an obese 5 year old on our hands. So if we can identify which babies are more a risk for becoming overweight, that would be helpful. I also know skinny babies who grew into obese kids and super chubby babies who grew into healthy kids... but individual stories are besides the point. They are talking about trends and risk.
    Sebbiemama

    Answer by Sebbiemama at 11:07 PM on Jan. 2, 2011

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